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 Dear Tobacco Education Coalition members-
 
It’s only the second month of the year and there are already many additional tobacco related updates for you to learn about!  Last month, we tried a new email format and we are happy to know that many of you read the updates and enjoyed the new look of the TEC Updates. Please let us know if you have any suggestions as to the type of format you would like to see, any stories you would like us to include or any announcements you would like us to place in the newsletter. Enjoy!  
 
Please read the brief headlines and/or summaries and click on the appropriate link for more information.
 
1)
Steering Committee Meeting Reminder
2) TEC Meeting Reminder
3)
 Santa Clara County Outpaces San Mateo County in Anti-Tobacco Efforts
4) FREE Upcoming Training: Motivational Interviewing for Tobacco Cessation
5) San Mateo County Guide on How to Engage the Media
6) Murder Suspect Arrested for Violating Alameda County Smoking Law
7) California Apartment Tenants Continue to be Exposed to Second-hand Smoke
8) Assembly Bill 1301 – Reducing Sales of Tobacco to Minors
9) California Assembly Votes to Outlaw Smoking in Hospital Campuses
10) UC System Banning Smoking from All Campuses
11) California Budget Proposes Cuts to Tobacco Prevention
12) State Economy to Get Big Jolt with Proposed New Tax on Cigarettes According to Study
13) A Study Suggests that Occasional Marijuana Smoking is not as Harmful to Lungs as Cigarettes
14) Joe Camel-like Tactics Used to Transform Youth Drinking Behavior
15) Nicotine Replacement Therapy May Be No Better than Quitting “Cold Turkey” in Preventing Smoking Relapse
16) The Bottom Line for New Mandatory Insurance Coverage of Tobacco Cessation Services
17) Spotlight on Oregon Advocate Who Helped Pass the First Indoor Smoking Ban
18) People Who Smoke Cigarettes and Cigars Fit Different Profile than Cigarette-Only Smokers
19) Oklahoma Legislators Propose Raising Legal Age to Buy Tobacco to 21
20) Lance Armstrong Dedicates $1.5 Million for Proposition 29 (CA Cancer Research Act)
 
 

1) Steering Committee Meeting

Our next Steering Committee meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, February 28th at 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 in Room 240 at the 2000 Alameda de las Pulgas building in San Mateo.

2) TEC Meeting Reminder

Our next coalition meeting will be held on Wednesday, March 7th from 11:30 pm to 1:30 pm in the Atrium room at 2000 Alameda de las Pulgas, in San Mateo.


3) Santa Clara County Outpaces San Mateo County in Anti-Tobacco Efforts
 
An article published in the San Jose Mercury News on the issue of newly released American Lung Association tobacco control grades, stated that Santa Clara County fared better than San Mateo County, earning an overall grade of “A” for its tobacco control efforts. According to the article, they received a high grade for banning tobacco smoke from dining and recreation areas and creating smoke-free housing. Additionally, they are said to have reduced the sales of tobacco products.
 
On the other hand, San Mateo County earned an overall grade of D. Of the 20 cities in San Mateo County, 13 received an F, four got a D and two a C. Belmont, which enacted bans on smoking in parks and apartments in 2009, was the only city to earn a B.
 
Click on the link for the entire story:
 
http://www.mercurynews.com/san-mateo-county-times/ci_19777370
 
4) FREE Upcoming Training: Motivational Interviewing for Tobacco Cessation
 
There will be a Motivational Interviewing as a tobacco cessation intervention, sponsored by the Alameda County Behavioral Health Services (BHCS) (in contract with the Alameda County Provider Network for Tobacco Dependence Treatment and Cessation), that will take place Wednesday, March 14, 2012 at the Behavioral Health Care Services, 2000 Embarcadero, 4th Floor, in Oakland. Participants will learn basic motivational interviewing techniques related to the Stages of Change and will be able to practice how to conduct one-on-one tobacco cessation interventions.
 
See the attached flyer for registration information and deadline.
 
 5) San Mateo County Guide on How to Engage the Media
 
The San Mateo County Department of Intergovernmental and Public Affairs is offering a resource guide to encourage public communication and promote civic engagement. The guide includes tips on clear writing, how to reach the public, contact information for the news media, community leaders and community groups, businesses and other organizations in San Mateo County. It is an excellent guide that will be very helpful to any of our partners who are trying to engage the news media or effectively get a message out to the public.

Please go to the following link for additional information:
 
http://smcnewsguide.wikispaces.com/
 
6) Murder Suspect Arrested for Violating Alameda County Smoking Law
 
A murder suspect was arrested for violating an Alameda County smoking law. Alameda County Sheriff deputies found the suspect smoking outside a Hayward sports bar violating the law indicating there is to be no smoking 20-feet from buildings. Deputies were preparing the citation when they ran a computer check on the suspect’s name and found that the Oakland Police was looking for him. According to the report, he was potentially involved in a murder case of a man killed in the city of Oakland.
 
To read the full article, click on the link below:
 
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2012/01/26/BALM1MUTUN.DTL&tsp=1
 
7) California Apartment Tenants Continue to be Exposed to Second-hand Smoke 
 
KQED, a Northern California National Public Radio Affiliate, recently covered  the issue of Smoke-free housing, and the progress that has been made around the issue in California. The excellent 3:44 minute clip, was part of the California Report program and can be listened to by clicking on the following link:
 
http://www.californiareport.org/archive/R201201230850/c.
 
8) Assembly Bill 1301 – Reducing Sales of Tobacco to Minors 
 
Assemblymember Jerry Hill’s AB 1301 passed out of the Senate Committee on Governance and Finance on January 11th of this year and continues to move forward in the legislative process.
 
AB 1301 would allow the Board of Equalization (BOE) to suspend retailers’ tobacco sales license if the store staff is caught selling to a minor 3 or more times in a 5-year period. The third time they are caught selling, their license will be suspended for 45 days and a fourth conviction will result in a 90-day suspension. A fifth conviction will result in the store getting its license revoked.
 
Current law only results in financial penalties for stores that are caught selling tobacco products to minors. The California Department of Public Health (DPH) uses the STAKE Act to implement sting operations to find those stores that are selling illegally. The BOE is authorized to suspend a license if a store is found to have sold to a minor multiple times. However, suspensions have never been made by the BOE because the law makes the penalty provisions inoperative if the DPH’s annual youth purchase survey finds that less than 13% of youth statewide are able to buy tobacco products. In the past few years, the statewide youth purchase survey has been around 10%, so the option for penalties does not kick in.
 
However, the survey results can be misleading as the STAKE stings (conducted at the local level) have shown that sales to minors have been at times 25% or higher. 

9) California Assembly Votes to Outlaw Smoking in Hospital Campuses
 
The Assembly passed Assemblymember Jerry Hill’s AB 1278, last month. Current law states it is only illegal to smoke in public buildings and areas within 20-feet of city/county/state/federal building entrances.  AB 1278 would prohibit people from smoking on the entire campuses of all hospitals in California. Assemblymember Hill stated that the legislation would protect people who are sick or particularly vulnerable from being exposed to dangerous second-hand smoke and would encourage patients, visitors and hospital employees to quit smoking.
 
To read the full article, go to the following link:
 
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/california-politics/2012/01/assembly-votes-to-ban-smoking-at-hospitas.html
 
 
10) UC System Banning Smoking from All Campuses
 
Over the next two years, the University of California is prohibiting cigarettes and other tobacco products from being used on its campuses. The ban has been adopted to help protect nonsmokers from secondhand smoke and prevent young people from becoming addicted.
 
Both, students and staff will be prohibited from smoking anywhere in the UC campus, including outdoor spaces, parking lots and private residences. There will be no designated smoking areas.
 
Per UC officials, the reason for the policy adoption is to help reduce people’s exposure to secondhand smoke and reduce smoking rates among people who work or study on the campuses.
 
Click on the link:
 
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2012/01/13/BAGJ1MOO9L.DTL
 
11) California Budget Proposes Cuts to Tobacco Prevention
 
Governor Jerry Brown released his budget proposal for fiscal year 2012-2013 on January 5, 2012. The budget proposal shows potential decreases in funding for the California Tobacco Control Program and the Department of Education, due to decreased projected revenues and insufficient funds in several Proposition 99 accounts. Details about the proposed decreases and proposed funding levels for all tobacco control programs through Proposition 99 can be reviewed at the link below:
 
http://www.center4tobaccopolicy.org/CTPO/_files/_file/2012-13%20Budget%20Proposal%20Update.pdf
 
12) State Economy to Get Big Jolt with Proposed New Tax on Cigarettes According to Study
 
The California Cancer Research Act (CCRA) initiative, which will be on the statewide June 5 ballot, would raise cigarette taxes by $1 a pack, if approved.  The tax would generate an estimated $855 million a year for anti-smoking education programs, medical research and tobacco law enforcement. The passage of the measure would create about 12,000 jobs and close to $2 billion in new economic activity in California. It would cause some loss of retail jobs due to fewer retail sales, but the loss will be offset by the new jobs created.
 
To read the full article, click on the link below:
 
http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2012/02/11465/state-economy-get-big-jolt-proposed-new-tax-cigarettes-study-finds
 
 
13) A Study Suggests that Occasional Marijuana Smoking is not as Harmful to Lungs as Cigarettes
 
A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that low to moderate use of marijuana is less harmful to the lungs than tobacco exposure. According to the study, the more a person smokes tobacco products, the more their lung function is negatively affected. The research did not find this to be the case with occasional marijuana use.
 
Researcher Mark Pletcher, MD, MPH, of the University of California, San Francisco, stated in a news release that an important factor aiding to explain the difference in effects between the two substances, was the amount of each that was typically smoked. Tobacco users normally smoked 10-20 cigarettes or more a day.
 
Marijuana users, tended to smoke only two to three times a month on average, so exposure to marijuana was much lower than for tobacco.
 
The full article can be found at:
 
http://www.drugfree.org/join-together/drugs/occasional-marijuana-smoking-not-as-harmful-to-lungs-as-cigarettes-study-suggests?utm_source=Join+Together+Daily&utm_campaign=462f481d8d-JT_Daily_News_38_Million_American&utm_medium=email
 
 
14) Joe Camel-like Tactics Used to Transform Youth Drinking Behavior
 
Diageo, the British multinational company was able to reverse the decline of distilled spirits among young people in the US by managing to gain “beer” status and with it, its regulatory advantages: lower taxes, easier availability and access to electronic media advertising, although their “beer” status violates most state laws because a product that mixes distilled spirits and beer is usually classified as a distilled spirit and not a beer.
 
Additionally, the company developed and implemented a marketing campaign that targeted youth, by combining youth-oriented media outlets, and a new product design geared to youthful tastes. Smirnoff Ice, for instance, became popular among young people, as a hip drink.
 
The Joe Camel youth brand studies of the 80’s influenced advocates into researching marketing strategies practiced by the tobacco industry. According to the article, similar work should be done relating to alcohol marketing and alcohol policy reform in the public health field.
 
Check out the full article here:
 
http://www.drugfree.org/join-together/alcohol/new-study-documents-joe-camel-like-tactics-to-transform-youth-drinking-behavior?utm_source=Join+Together+Daily&utm_campaign=b13ba6e436-JT_Daily_News_Study_Documents&utm_medium=email
 
15) Nicotine Replacement Therapy May Be No Better than Quitting “Cold Turkey” in Preventing Smoking Relapse
 
The federal government recommends that smokers consider using medication when they try to quit smoking. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention note in a fact sheet that nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has shown to be effective for treating tobacco dependence.
 
However, according to a new study, smokers who use nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) such as patches or gum to quit are just as likely to start smoking as people who quit “cold turkey.”
 
Gregory N. Connolly, Director of the Center for Global Tobacco Control at the Harvard School of Public Health said that the study should encourage the FDA to only approve medications that have been proven to be effective in helping smokers quit in the long-term and that decrease the nicotine. This will help reduce the overall addictiveness of cigarettes.
 
Read the full article by clicking at the link below:
 
http://www.drugfree.org/join-together/tobacco/nicotine-replacement-therapy-no-better-than-quitting-cold-turkey-in-preventing-smoking-relapse?utm_source=Join+Together+Daily&utm_campaign=384495af0f-JT_Daily_News_Researchers_Seek&utm_medium=email
 
16) The Bottom Line for New Mandatory Insurance Coverage of Tobacco Cessation Services

Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), the new federal health law, insurance coverage is expanded to cover tobacco cessation services. Private insurance plans and Medicaid both must cover tobacco cessation services with little to no cost to patients. However, coverage is only mandatory for pregnant women covered by Medicaid, leaving other Medicaid beneficiaries out of the mandatory coverage provision. This population represents the group that is mostly affected by the tobacco epidemic as smoking rates among Medicaid enrollees has almost doubled that of the general population. Consequently, the ACA’s lack of tobacco cessation coverage for this population might cause the disparity to grow.
 
To read more, go to the following link:
 
http://drugfree.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=fe8b33972f29b8e3f893baefc&id=70fa75468a&e=bf66151c63
 
A letter from many national health groups released in late January encourages U.S. Health and Human Services to modify the rules to ensure all Americans will have access to best practice interventions to help them quit smoking:
 
http://www.acpm.org/resource/resmgr/Policy-Files/2011_Ltr_EssentialHealthBene.pdf
 
 17) Spotlight on Oregon Advocate Who Helped Pass the First Indoor Smoking Ban
 
Bobbie DeRamus, an 86 year-old resident of Roseburg, OR, testified various times in front of a state Senate Committee when legislators were considering the Oregon Indoor Clean Air Act. DeRamus’ health was greatly affected by the secondhand cigarette smoke she inhaled at work in the 1970’s and 1980’s.
 
Smoking indoors was prohibited in public buildings, except in designated areas, beginning 1983. That same year, DeRamus left her job at the Children’s Services Division in Roseburg due to health consequences caused by the secondhand smoke she was exposed to.
 
Her story is a reminder of how each of us has a lot to offer in making our communities and our state a healthier place!
 
Click on the link to read more:
 
http://www.nrtoday.com/article/20120205/NEWS/120209902/1063/NEWS&ParentProfile=1055
 

18) People Who Smoke Cigarettes and Cigars Fit Different Profile than Cigarette-Only Smokers
 
A new study shows that people who smoke both cigarettes and cigars tend to be young, African American, male, unemployed and less educated than those who smoke cigarettes only.
 
Amanda Richardson, Director for Research and Evaluation at Legacy, stated that research has shown that cigars and cigarillos have increased among young adults due to lower prices and sweet flavors that make them more appealing.
 
Read the full article by following the link below:
 
http://drugfree.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=fe8b33972f29b8e3f893baefc&id=f5be48f85c&e=bf66151c63

 
 

19) Oklahoma Legislators Propose Raising Legal Age to Buy Tobacco to 21
 
A bill to increase the legal age to purchase tobacco passed out of the House Public Health Committee this week and will now go to the floor of the Oklahoma House of Representatives.  If the bill becomes law, Oklahoma would become the first state to raise the legal age to purchase tobacco from 18 to 21. The age limit would rise to 19 in 2013, 20 in 2014, and 21 in 2015.
 
Several other states have already raised the legal age to 19: Alabama, Alaska, New Jersey, and Utah.
 
To read the full story, click below:
 
http://www.drugfree.org/join-together/prevention/oklahoma-legislators-propose-raising-legal-age-to-buy-tobacco-to-21?utm_source=Join+Together+Daily&utm_campaign=0076e598a6-JT_Daily_News_DEA_Targets_Large&utm_medium=email
 

 

20) Lance Armstrong Dedicates $1.5 Million for Proposition 29 (CA Cancer Research Act)
 
This week there is news that the foremost Cancer Prevention advocate in the state, bicyclist Lance Armstrong, is committing $1.5 million from his foundation to support a tobacco tax initiative that would raise the tax on each pack of cigarettes by $1.00, using funds generated to support cancer research and prevention programs.
 
To read the full story, click below:
 
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/california-politics/2012/02/lance-armstrong-tobacco-tax-cancer-initiative-california-15-million.html

 
 

We hope you learned something new and enjoyed the tobacco control updates we gathered for you. Please share this update and any specific articles you think may be helpful with your colleagues, students, and friends.  Thanks for all the work you do for the residents and visitors of San Mateo County!
 
Gabriela and Derek
San Mateo County Tobacco Prevention Program

 
 
 
 
You are receiving this email because you are a part of our coalition.

Our mailing address is: 
San Mateo County Health System
2000 Alameda de las Pulgas
Suite 230
San Mateo, CA 94403

Copyright © 2012 San Mateo County Health System, All rights reserved.