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News & Shmooze 

1851 Noriega Street San Francisco, CA 94122 ● (415) 564-5665
Shul Opening Update

Daily services are now held in the main sanctuary. This necessitates extra vigilance to ensure a low-risk COVID-19 environment. Therefore, it is imperative that anyone wishing to attend services inform the rabbi in advance. In addition, anyone who has been exposed to someone with COVID-19 or has a cough, shortness of breath, fever, chills, muscle pain, sore throat or new loss of taste or smell must stay home.

Weather permitting - Shabbat services continue to be held outside. Whether inside or outside, all participants must wear masks.

The Rabbi's Blog: Living Jewish in San Francisco
I am very concerned about the deterioration of civil discourse in our society. There has been a decades-long process of decline that desperately needs to be corrected. The current occupant of the White House is not the cause, he is just a byproduct of a corrosive environment that has been allowed to persist for way too long. My feelings on this matter are expressed quite accurately in the following articles
Shabbat Noach
Friday, October 23- Saturday, October 24
Z'manim:
Friday, October 23
7:45am    Shacharit 
6:03pm    Candlelighting
6:05pm    Mincha/Ma'ariv 

Shabbat, October 24
Noach
9:30am     Shacharit 
5:55pm     Mincha/Ma'ariv
7:00pm     Havdalah
Sunday, October 25
8:00am    Shacharit 
6:0pm      Mincha/Ma'ariv


Monday-Thursday, October 26-29
7:45am    Shacharit
6:00pm    Mincha/Ma'ariv



 
Adath Israel Zoom World
Sunday, October 25, 9:00am
The Building of King Solomon's Temple
Meeting ID: 859 1987 7123
Password: 333274
Call-In Number: (669) 900-6833
Meeting ID: 867 5437 5483
Password: 931188
Call-In Number: (669) 900-6833
Meeting ID: 870 7344 7128
Password: 831234
Call-In Number: (669) 900-6833
Meeting ID: 854 7019 6516
Password: 716117
Call-In Number: (669) 900-6833

Abe Newman for Shmini Atzeret Yizkor
Bonnie & Fred Kalbrosky in honor of the birthday of their son, Matt
Heddy Pilpel in honor of Libby & Paul Becker, Vicki Keyak, Rabbi & Rebbetzin Landau and Claire Manber
Jolana Hollander for the General Fund
Joe & Anna Hollander in appreciation for the Rabbi’s weekly message    
Edita & Steven Clarfield for the General Fund

Dr. Leonid & Ludmila Khamishon for the Yahrzeit of Esther Medovaya
Janice & Richard Freeman for the Yahrzeits of Dora & Michael Steiner
Haim & Melissa Beressi for the Yahrzeit of Dagny Beressi
Keith Gabriel for the Yahrzeit of Theodor Jakob Gabriel
Dr. Elliot Eisenberg for Shmini Atzeret Yizkor

Mazal Tov! It's a Girl and Her Name is - Yael!
To Rabbi & Judy Traub and Hillel & Keren Traub on the birth of a great granddaughter/granddaughter to Rachel & Ariel Benhayoun  
Enjoy Metropolitan Sushi
Something new is cooking at Metropolitan Sushi. Check out the new Mexican themed menu, or the classic sushi and Shabbat menus. 
Parasha in a Nutshell

G-d instructs Noah—the only righteous man in a world consumed by violence and corruption—to build a large wooden teivah (“ark”), coated within and without with pitch. A great deluge, says G-d, will wipe out all life from the face of the earth; but the ark will float upon the water, sheltering Noah and his family, and two members (male and female) of each animal species. Rain falls for 40 days and nights, and the waters churn for 150 days more before calming and beginning to recede. The ark settles on Mount Ararat, and from its window Noah dispatches a raven, and then a series of doves, “to see if the waters were abated from the face of the earth.” When the ground dries completely—exactly one solar year (365 days) after the onset of the Flood—G-d commands Noah to exit the teivah and repopulate the earth.

Noah builds an altar and offers sacrifices to G-d. G-d swears never again to destroy all of mankind because of their deeds and sets the rainbow as a testimony of His new covenant with man. G-d also commands Noah regarding the sacredness of life: murder is deemed a capital offense, and while man is permitted to eat the meat of animals, he is forbidden to eat flesh or blood taken from a living animal.

Noah plants a vineyard and becomes drunk on its produce. Two of Noah’s sons, Shem and Japheth, are blessed for covering up their father’s nakedness, while his third son, Ham, is punished for taking advantage of his debasement.

The descendants of Noah remain a single people, with a single language and culture, for ten generations. Then they defy their Creator by building a great tower to symbolize their own invincibility; G-d confuses their language so that “one does not comprehend the tongue of the other,” causing them to abandon their project and disperse across the face of the earth, splitting into seventy nations.

The Parshah of Noach concludes with a chronology of the ten generations from Noah to Abram (later Abraham), and the latter’s journey from his birthplace of Ur Casdim to Charan, on the way to the land of Canaan (Chabad.org). 


Parasha Thought
By Rav Mordechai Kamenestky

The Flood was history. The era of robbery, greed, and corruption was washed away by its powerful waves. Peace and tranquillity reigned. The entire world was now united — against the Almighty.

The world community decided that in the interest of harmony they would join forces and build a colossal tower to reach to the heavens. Then they would ascend the tower and do battle with G-d Himself.

It was an ambitious dream, but they were united and determined.

Hashem, however, had other plans. The Torah tells us that He convened the same tribunal He consulted with in creating man and this time decided that He would not destroy the builders. He would confuse them. He changed their languages so they were not able to communicate. One man would ask for a hammer and receive a nail, a saw, or a blank stare. Enraged, the requestor would then argue with and even strike his fellow builder who was impeding progress. Eventually a small civil war erupted on the construction site. The men dispersed and the construction project was eternally halted. And seventy distinct nations ultimately emerged.

It is puzzling: how does a problem such as lack of communication stop a lofty project of such tremendous scope? Didn’t the French and British jointly finish the Chunnel, the tunnel that connects the two countries, under the English Channel?

I once asked my rebbe, Reb Mendel Kaplan, who after escaping from the Nazi inferno lived in Shanghai, China for nearly five years, how he was able to communicate with the Chinese. He held up a dollar. “Everybody understands this language,” he said.

Don’t people of different languages manage to communicate when they want to realize a noteworthy mission? Why was there no way to gather the forces, create new communication techniques, and continue the project?

A college professor was known to give difficult tests yet he had a very lenient policy. If a student missed the exam he could take a make-up test the next day. The make-up, however, was always the same test the professor had given the day prior.

15 minutes before the final exam, of a particularly difficult semester, the professor received a phone call. The four voices crowding the phone booth sounded desperate.

“Professor, we were on our way to take your final and we got a flat tire. Please let us take a make-up exam tomorrow.” “Certainly,” the professor responded.

The next day the four young men walked in feeling quite smug. They had reviewed the entire final with a friend who had taken it the day before. The professor seated the four students in different corners of the room. He placed a single sheet of paper in front of each one and stated crisply.

“Today’s make-up exam entails just one question. I would like you young men, each in his own way, to write down for me…” he looked at the young men and smiled knowingly — “which tire was flat?”

When the goal entails truth and true good for mankind, when the goals are harmonious with the concepts that transcend culture, language, custom, or vogue, then nothing can impede success.

But when selfishness rules and individual glory and gratification is the motivation, then the simplest problem can cause total disunity, contempt, and ultimately failure.

When our common goals are enveloped in common good, then we can unite under the most difficult of circumstances. However, if our motivations are selfish, the slightest impediment will leave our entire project and mission flat. As flat as the tire of Babel.

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Congregation Adath Israel · 1851 Noriega Street · San Francisco, CA 94122 · USA

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