Copy
A CIS Weekly update on immigration policy related
events in the United States and around the world.

Immigration Events, 10/5/15


Support the Center for Immigration Studies by donating on line here: http://cis.org/donate

ATTN Federal employees: The Center's Combined Federal Campaign number is 10298.
 
1. 10/7, DC - House hearing on the impact of the Syrian refugee crisis - [New Listing]
2. 10/7, DC - Discussion on understanding Europe's migration challenge - [New Listing]
3. 10/8, DC - Senate hearing on threats to the homeland - [New Listing]
4. 10/8, DC - Webinar on variations in in-state tuition, financial aid, and scholarship policies for illegal alien youth - [New Listing]
5. 10/8, Cambridge, MA - Workshop on Mexico-U.S. migration, legal status, and the social context of indigenousness
6. 10/15, DC - Discussion on state policies toward providing driver’s licenses for illegal aliens - [New Listing]
7. 10/15, Cambridge, MA - Workshop on variation in local government responses to immigrants across local actors
8. 10/16, DC - Discussion on the Fourteenth Amendment and birthright citizenship
9. 10/19, San Diego - Seminar on urban community gardens as home in the immigrant inner-city - [New Listing]
10. 10/22, NYC - Conference on immigration and the trend towards dystopian democracies in Europe and the USA
11. 10/26, San Diego - Seminar on trans-migrants and trans-borders - [New Listing]
12. 10/27, San Diego - Discussion on the European refugee crisis - [New Listing]
13. 10/27-30, DC - Certificate program course on global trends in international migration
14. 10/29, DC - 12th annual Immigration Law and Policy conference
15. 10/29, Cambridge, MA - Workshop on return migration of second-generation Chinese American professionals to China
16. 11/17, Cambridge, MA - Seminar on the law and politics of unresolved refugee crises'
17. 11/18-20, DC - Certificate program course on labor migration
18. 11/18-22, Denver - Immigration at the American Anthropological Association annual meeting
19. 11/24-25, Hanover, Germany - Conference on migration management and integration policy
20. 11/30, San Diego - Seminar on comparative responses to asylum seeking in Europe, Australia, the U.S., and the Middle East - [New Listing]
21. 12/3, Cambridge, MA - Workshop on the residential decisions of unauthorized migrants
22. 12/8-10, The Hague, Netherlands - 4th World BORDERPOL Congress


1.
The Syrian Refugee Crisis and Its Impact on the Security of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program

10:30 a.m., Wednesday October 7, 2015
House Committee on the Judiciary
2141 Rayburn House Office Building
http://judiciary.house.gov/index.cfm/hearings?ID=99B5D231-C109-4F9B-B8E3-249530DBB6B3

Witnesses:
TBA

Return to TOP


********
********

2.
Open or Closed Borders? Understanding Europe's Migration Challenge

11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., Wednesday, October 7, 2015
Center for Strategic and International Studies, First floor conference room
1616 Rhode Island Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
http://csis.org/event/open-or-closed-borders-understanding-europes-migration-challenge

Speakers:

Thomas Zwiefelhofer
Deputy Prime Minister of Liechtenstein

Catherine Wiesner
Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

Shelly Pitterman
Regional Representative for the USA and the Caribbean, UNHCR

Moderator:

Heather A. Conley
Senior Vice President for Europe, Eurasia, and the Arctic
Director, CSIS Europe Program

Return to TOP


********
********

3.
Threats to the Homeland

10:00 a.m., Thursday October 8, 2015
Senate Committee on Homeland Security
Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest
Dirksen Senate Office Building, Room 342
http://www.hsgac.senate.gov/hearings/threats-to-the-homeland2015

Witnesses:
Jeh C. Johnson, Secretary
U.S. Department of Homeland Security

James B. Comey, Director
Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice

Nicholas J. Rasmussen, Director
National Counterterrorism Center, Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Return to TOP


********
********

4.
Variations in In-State Tuition, Financial Aid, and Scholarship Policies for Unauthorized Youth

12:00 p.m. EDT, Thursday, October 8, 2015
MPI Webinar
http://www.migrationpolicy.org/events/variations-state-tuition-financial-aid-and-scholarship-policies-unauthorized-youth

Speakers:
Tanya Broder, Senior Staff Attorney, National Immigration Law Center

Erin Howard, Director, Office of Latino Outreach and Services, Bluegrass Community and Technical College

Candy Marshall, President, TheDream.US

Angelo Mathay, Associate Policy Analyst, MPI

Margie McHugh, Director, National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy, MPI

Description: At least 17 states have enacted measures to allow qualified unauthorized immigrant youth to pay resident tuition rates at postsecondary institutions. However, states differ significantly in their eligibility requirements for in-state tuition, and policies regarding the availability of state financial aid and other benefits are also quite varied. In addition, numerous proposals on these issues have been under consideration in statehouses across the United States this year—some seeking to expand access to tuition and other supports, others seeking to repeal existing measures or otherwise restrict benefits.

Join the Migration Policy Institute’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy and other national experts for a discussion of these patchwork policies, their implications for unauthorized immigrant youth seeking two- and four-year college degrees, and the progress of major new proposals being considered by states this year. The webinar will also mark the release of updated information on the college access, tuition, and financial aid policies in the top 15 states for youth potentially eligible to apply for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. In addition, hear about the new round of scholarships available from TheDream.US, the largest provider of scholarships for youth with DACA or Temporary Protected Status (TPS) who cannot afford to pay for college.

Return to TOP


********
********

5.
Mexico-U.S. Migration, Legal Status, and the Social Context of Indigenousness

12:00-1:00 p.m., Thursday, October 8, 2015
Department of Sociology
William James Hall, Room 601
33 Kirkland Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
http://sociology.fas.harvard.edu/event/asad-asad-and-jackie-hwang-mexico-us-migration-legal-status-and-social-context

Speakers:
Asad Asad And Jackie Hwang, Harvard University

Return to TOP


********
********

6.
Deciding Who Drives
State officials discuss policy approaches to providing driver’s licenses for unauthorized immigrants

1:30-3:00 p.m., October 15, 2015
The Pew Charitable Trusts
901 E St. NW, Washington, DC 20004
http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/about/events/2015/deciding-who-drives

Description: U.S. citizens and lawful immigrants can routinely obtain and renew driver’s licenses, and some states have decided to allow unauthorized immigrants to do so as well. As of the summer of 2015, 10 states—California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Vermont, and Washington—and the District of Columbia issue driver’s licenses to this population. Nearly 37 percent of unauthorized immigrants live in jurisdictions where they may obtain licenses.

State legislative activity on this issue has increased in recent years. In 2013 alone, eight states and the District passed laws making unauthorized immigrants eligible for driver’s licenses. (One was later repealed.) This year, Delaware and Hawaii passed similar laws, and they are preparing to implement them.

To inform the dialogue on whether and how to license unauthorized immigrants, The Pew Charitable Trusts will bring together policymakers, practitioners, and researchers to discuss the decisions that states must make to allow unauthorized immigrants to drive legally.

Pew experts will share findings about how the states that issue licenses to unauthorized immigrants have designed and implemented their laws. A panel discussion with officials from California, Delaware, and Nevada will follow. Because this issue is dynamic, these state experiences can inform how policymakers grapple with similar decisions in other states.

Speakers:
Terri Albertson, Administrator, Management Services and Programs Division, Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles

Erika Contreras, Chief of staff, Office of California State Senator Ricardo Lara

Scott Vien, Director, Division of Motor Vehicles, Delaware Department of Transportation

Michele Waslin, Officer, Pew

Moderator:
Adam Hunter, Director, Pew

Register: https://www.cvent.com/events/deciding-who-drives-how-states-approach-issuing-driver-s-licenses-to-unauthorized-immigrants/registration-de5296acc1cd4a8d9210bb360767d1a0.aspx

Return to TOP


********
********

7.
The Patchwork Within: Variation in Local Government Responses to Immigrants Across Local Actors

12:00-1:30 p.m., Thursday, October 15, 2015
Department of Sociology
William James Hall, Room 601
33 Kirkland Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
http://sociology.fas.harvard.edu/event/abigail-fisher-williamson-patchwork-within-variation-local-government-responses

Speaker:
Abigail Fisher Williamson
Assistant Professor of Political Science and Public Policy and Law, Trinity College

Return to TOP


********
********

8.
Does the Fourteenth Amendment Require Birthright Citizenship?

11:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Friday, October 16, 2015
The Heritage Foundation, Allison Auditorium
214 Massachusetts Ave NE
Washington DC 20002-4999
http://www.heritage.org/events/2015/10/birthright-citizenship

Description: The Fourteenth Amendment states that “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” Many believe that this means being born on U.S. soil is sufficient to confer citizenship. Some scholars, however, argue that the Constitution does not confer citizenship on children born in the United States to parents who are illegal aliens because they owe allegiance to another government. Others maintain that the drafters of the Fourteenth Amendment sought to restore the common law doctrine of jus soli—right of the soil—which had been abrogated by the Supreme Court’s Dred Scott decision and that subsequent Supreme Court decisions support this interpretation. Does the Citizenship Clause mandate birthright citizenship? Legal experts John Eastman and James Ho will explore this hotly debated question that has important legal and political consequences.

Speakers:
John Eastman
Henry Salvatori Professor of Law and Community Service, Chapman University School of Law

James Ho
Partner, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP and former Solicitor General of Texas

Host:
John Malcolm
Director, Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, and the Ed Gilbertson and Sherry Lindberg Gilbertson Senior Legal Fellow

Return to TOP


********
********

9.
Urban Community Gardens as Home in the Immigrant Inner-City

12:00 p.m., Monday, October 19, 2015
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building, Room 115, First Floor
Center for Comparative Immigration Studies
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0548
http://ccis.ucsd.edu/category/events/research-seminars/

Speaker:
Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, Professor of Sociology, University of Southern California

Return to TOP


********
********

10.
Towards Dystopian Democracies in Europe and the USA?
From Prejudice in Immigration Policies to Mass Surveillance in Counterterrorism Operations

6:30–8:30 p.m., Thursday, October 22, 2015
New York University, Lipton Hall
108 West Third Street
New York, NY 10012
https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/85180/nyu-conference-towards-dystopian-democracies-europe-and-usa

Description: Developments of democracy in Europe and the USA have followed mutually influencing paths over the past two centuries. From the declarations of rights to the establishment of democratic institutions after WWII, these regions have built their governments on the foundation of human rights protection. These foundations have now been weakened by the responses to a number of challenges, in particular immigration and counter-terrorism.

The influx of migrants and asylum-seekers, from Africa and the Middle East to Europe and from Central and Latin America to the USA, are being met with a combination of repressive measures: walls and fences, naval military operations, laws criminalizing undocumented immigration, racial profiling, insufficient integration policies, to mention a few. Populist and xenophobic parties have fuelled racist resentment towards Muslims and immigrants in general and have encouraged hate speech and crimes.

At the same time, the USA and Europe are increasingly engaging in counter-terrorism operations in a way which is straining the democratic fabric of our society. Some of these measures have a disproportionate impact on ethnic and religious minorities, thus further polarizing societies. Governments and policy makers, claiming the incompatibility of security with human rights protection, are adopting laws and policies, which increase the powers of security services without guaranteeing the checks and balances necessary in a democracy. Ultimately, such policies contribute to the erosion of democratic core values on both sides of the Atlantic and play in the hands of populist parties and of those who promote antidemocratic causes.

Program:

6:30-6:45 p.m.
WELCOME ADDRESS - Thomas J. Carew, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, NYU

INTRODUCTION - Jean-Philippe Dedieu, CIRHUS Research Fellow and SCA Visiting Scholar, NYU

6:45-7:15 p.m.
LECTURES - Nils Muiznieks, Commissioner for Human Rights, Council of Europe

Susan N. HERMAN, President of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)

7:15-8:15 p.m.
DISCUSSION & DEBATES WITH THE ROOM

Sally Engle Merry, Silver Professor of Anthropology & Faculty Co-director of the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice at the New York University School of Law, NYU

Larry Siems, Writer, Human Rights Activist, and Editor of Guantánamo Diary by Mohamedou Ould Slahi (New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2015)

8:15-8:30 p.m. - CONCLUSION
Jacqueline Bhabha, FXB Director of Research, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights at the Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard

RSVP to vd526@nyu.edu by October 20

Return to TOP


********
********

11.
From Trans-Migrants to Trans-Borders: A Comparison of Cross-Border Activities Across Three Categories of Migrants in France

12:00 p.m., Monday, October 26, 2015
Eleanor Roosevelt College Administration Building, Room 115, First Floor
Center for Comparative Immigration Studies
University of California, San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0548
http://ccis.ucsd.edu/category/events/research-seminars/

Speaker:
Mirna Safi, Research Professor, Department of Sociology, Sciences Po

Return to TOP


********
********

12.
The European Refugee Crisis
12:00 p.m., Tuesday, October 27, 2015
Malamud Room, Institute of the Americas
University of California, San Diego
10111 N Torrey Pines Rd
La Jolla, CA
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/european-refugee-crisis-registration-18635945615

Speaker:
Kathi Anderson, Survivors of Torture

Fatima El-Tayeb, Professor of Literature and Ethnic Studies, UCSD

David Murphy, International Rescue Committee

Michael Provence, Associate Professor of History, UCSD

Tom K. Wong, Assistant Professor of Political Science, UCSD

Return to TOP


********
********

13.
Certificate in International Migration Studies

XCPD-700 - Global Trends in International Migration

Course Description: Worldwide international migration is a large and growing phenomenon, with more than 230 million people now living outside of their home countries for extended periods. Understanding the complex dynamics behind international migration is essential to improved policies and programs to address the multiple causes and consequences of these movements of people. This course provides an overview of international migration numbers and trends, causes of population movements, the impact of international migration on source and receiving countries, and policy responses to population movements.

The course provides an introduction to the major theories underpinning the study of international migration, including the new economics of labor migration, dual labor market theory, world systems theory, cumulative causation, and migration networks theory. The course focuses attention on domestic and international legal regimes regarding migration, examining laws, major legal cases and regulatory frameworks. It also examines issues pertaining to the integration of immigrants in destination countries. The connections between migration and such other issues as security, development and environmental change are discussed.

Course Objectives:

At the completion of the course, a successful student will be able to:

* Assess the positive and negative impacts of international migration on source, transit, and destination countries;

* Describe the international legal frameworks that set out the rights of migrants and the responsibilities of states;

* Discuss and articulate the strengths and weaknesses of the principal policy frameworks governing the admission of migrants, control of irregular migration, and protection of refugees and other forced migrants;

* Explain the importance of gender in understanding the causes and consequences of international migration; and

* Describe models for integration of immigrants in destination countries and articulate the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches.

Location:
640 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20001
http://scs.georgetown.edu/courses/1007/global-trends-in-international-migration

Class Meets: Tuesday-Friday, October 27-30, 2015, 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Instructors: Susan Martin, Elzbieta Gozdziak, Becky Hoven, Lindsay Lowell

Tuition: $995.00, 32 Contact hours

Register: https://portal.scs.georgetown.edu/coursebasket/publicCourseBasket.do?method=addToCart

Return to TOP


********
********

14.
12th Annual Immigration Law and Policy Conference

9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Thursday, October 29, 2015
Georgetown University Law Center
Bernard P. McDonough Hall, Hart Auditorium
600 New Jersey Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20001
https://cliniclegal.org/ILPC

Description: While major reform of the U.S. immigration system seems to be at a standstill, issues of immigration policy are very much at the forefront of political debates. The 12th annual Immigration Law and Policy Conference will offer timely policy and legal analysis and discussion on key immigration topics including executive action, detention policies, Central American migration, state and local initiatives, and a global perspective on refugees. Panels will feature government officials, researchers, advocates, and other immigration experts.

Contact: erusha Haasenritter, jhaasenritter@cliniclegal.org

Keynote Speaker:
Jeh Johnson, United States Secretary of Homeland Security

Featured Sessions:

Today’s Politics and U.S. Immigration Policy
Immigration, never far from the headlines, has assumed even greater visibility in recent months as the election cycle heats up. The perennially popular State of Play panel, moderated by MPI Senior Fellow Doris Meissner, will focus on the role of immigration in presidential campaigns and beyond. Speakers will provide their perspectives on the role immigration is playing in the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election, the influence of immigration-related demographic change on policy and politics across the country, and the congressional landscape ahead for immigration action, both through appropriations and substantive legislation

Examining the Growth of Immigrant Detention and the Future of Detention Alternatives
The government has increasingly relied on detention, including for families and children, as an immigration enforcement strategy. The beneficiaries of these policies include the private prison industry which runs most immigrant detention facilities. This panel will examine the current legal and political landscape of immigrant detention, the role of the private prison industry, and cost-effective and humane alternatives to detention. The panel will also address the recent court ruling stating that immigrant children may not be detained in unlicensed, secure facilities and calling for their release. Stakeholders including government representatives and immigrant advocates will discuss these issues and the conditions they see on a daily basis in the immigrant detention facilities.

Unaccompanied Central American Children: One Year Later
In 2014, over 67,000 unaccompanied children from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras arrived in the United States, the largest number of such children ever apprehended by U.S. Customs and Border Protection in any fiscal year. Compared to earlier arrivals, these children included higher proportions of younger children and girls. These developments occurred in the midst of major executive branch policy change regarding the deferred action of long-residing unauthorized immigrants. With financial and political support from the United States, Mexico increased its enforcement against migrants at its southern border with Guatemala. In April 2015, Georgetown Human Rights Institute law students reported in The Cost of Stemming the Tide how immigration enforcement practices in southern Mexico limited migrant children’s access to international protection. Through June 2015, the number of Central American unaccompanied child arrivals has decreased by more than half. Whether and the extent to which Mexico continues to detain and deport significant numbers of these children at the southern Mexican border with Guatemala is yet to be determined. This panel will focus on the roles of the U.S. and Mexican governments in the development, funding, and implementation of these enforcement policies and practices, during a time when one of the significant migration push factors—violence in the communities where these children live—worsened or continued unabated. As the situation evolves, the panel will address policy and practice changes that affect the movement, arrival, and reception of these Central American children.

Exploring the Future of Executive Action
The most prominent of President Obama’s November 2014 executive actions on immigration have been the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program and the expansion of the existing Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Together, these programs could protect up to 5.2 million unauthorized immigrants from deportation, and allow them to work lawfully. The implementation of DAPA and the DACA expansion has been stalled in federal court, and its outcome will most likely be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. This panel will review the possible outcomes and timeline for the litigation and the political and practical challenges for implementation they create.

Meanwhile, another important executive action, the Priority Enforcement Program (PEP), was launched on July 1 as the successor to the controversial Secure Communities program. PEP represents an approach to federal-local cooperation on immigration enforcement more tailored to the demands of individual local jurisdictions. The panel will discuss how PEP is distinct from its predecessor, and its implementation challenges.

Return to TOP


********
********

15.
Chasing the American Dream Abroad: Return Migration of Second-Generation Chinese American Professionals to China

12:00-1:00 p.m., Thursday, October 29, 2015
Department of Sociology
William James Hall, Room 601
33 Kirkland Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
http://sociology.fas.harvard.edu/event/leslie-wang-chasing-american-dream-abroad-return-migration-second-generation-chinese

Speaker:
Leslie Wang
Assistant Professor of Sociology at University of Massachusetts, Boston

Return to TOP


********
********

16.
Still Waiting for Tomorrow: The Law and Politics of Unresolved Refugee Crises' with particular emphasis on the refugees in the Middle East

The Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, November 17, 2015
Center for International Studies, Room E40-464
1 Amherst Street
Cambridge, MA 02142
http://web.mit.edu/cis/www/migration/seminars.html?utm_source=E-mail+Updates&utm_campaign=7f8e7a59a9-Immigration_Events_9_23_149_23_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7dc4c5d977-7f8e7a59a9-44166121#seminarseries

Speaker:
Speaker: Susan Akram, Director, International Human Rights Clinic, Boston University

Return to TOP


********
********

17.
Certificate in International Migration Studies

XCPD-707 - Labor Migration: Permanent Settlers, Temporary Workers, and Unauthorized Migrants

Course Description: Migration in search of better employment and economic opportunities fuels most international mobility. This class examines the role of migrants in the labor market, making a careful distinction between the legal status of migrants with different migratory strategies and levels of skill. We examine the legal/policy forces that shape migrants' labor market outcomes, or their "assimilation," as well as the impact that migrants, in turn, have on the economy. We explore how US policies and their legal status affect their fortunes in the workplace and shape sectors of the economy. The sometimes conflicting research literature will be reviewed with an eye toward policy-relevant conclusions. Finally, the role of the US and other nations' admission systems in managing migrants' labor supply will be examined, including contemporary debates on how to best manage tomorrow's labor flows.

Course Objectives:

At the completion of the course, a successful student will be able to:

* Examine the legal/policy forces that shape migrants’ labor market outcomes.

* Discuss the impact that migrants have on an economy.

* Explain how U.S. policies and migrants’ legal status affect their fortunes in the workplace and shape sectors of the economy.

* Examine the role of the US and other nations’ admission systems in managing migrants’ labor supply.

Location:
640 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20001
http://scs.georgetown.edu/courses/977/labor-migration-permanent-settlers-temporary-workers-and-unauthorized-migrants

Class Meets: 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Wednesday-Friday, November 18-20, 2015

Tuition: $895.00, 24 contact hours

Instructors: Elzbieta Gozdziak, Lindsay Lowell, Susan Martin

Register: https://portal.scs.georgetown.edu/coursebasket/publicCourseBasket.do?method=addToCart

Return to TOP


********
********

18.
114th American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting

Wednesday-Sunday, November 18-22, 2015
Colorado Convention Center
700 14th Street
Denver, CO 80202

Headquarter Hotel
Hyatt Regency Denver at Colorado Convention Center
650 15th Street
Denver, CO 80202
http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/

Immigration-related sessions:

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

2:00-3:45 p.m.
STRANGE HOMECOMINGS: A RE/CONSIDERATION OF MIGRATION AND RETURN
https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogrampreliminary/Session14313.html

In an era of unprecedented global movement, scholarship has increasingly focused on migrations across multiple borders. Less theorized are multiple forms of “return” and how such movement fits within studies of migration and transnationalism. Returns may be deliberate or forced, celebrated journeys or homecomings that are not actually so, movement framed by welcome and/or marginalization. Return migration can result in estrangement where familiarity is assumed, but may also create unexpected connections in surprising forms and spaces.

2:00 p.m.
Returning Again: The Destinations of Deportation
Deborah A. Boehm, University of Nevada, Reno

2:15 p.m.
Heroes, Victims, and Villains: The Making of Spanish Return Migrants
Mikaela H Rogozen-Soltar, University of Nevada Reno, Department of Anthropology

2:30 p.m.
Return Migration and Its Emotional Costs: The Irreconcilable Relationship Between Familial Obligations, Caring and Ambition
Maria Tapias, Grinnell College, Department of Anthropology

2:45 p.m.
Nothing Local: Scenarios of Return Migration and Global “Wars”
Laurie Kain Hart PhD, Haverford College - Department of Anthropology and Philippe Bourgois, University of Pennsylvania

3:00 p.m.
Discussant
Takeyuki Tsuda, Arizona State University

3:15 p.m.
Discussant
Susan C. Bibler Coutin (University of California, Irvine)

Thursday, November 19, 2015
8:00-9:45 a.m.

DE-Fa.m.MILIARIZING MIGRATION: STUDIES FROM ZONES OF TRANSIT
https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogrampreliminary/Session14352.html

Session participants contemplate movements through geopolitical, physical, territorial, sociocultural and even existential spaces. While focusing on the materiality of movements, their often-extreme violence and risk, panelists are also interested in theorizing "transit” as a moral condition, containing within it the hopes, longings, fears, and desires of displaced people.

8:00 a.m.
Masculinities, Relatedness, and Care Among Deportees in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico
Tobin Hansen, University of Oregon

8:15 a.m.
Stuck in the Middle with You: The Intimacies of Carework and Smuggling Along Central American Transit Routes in Mexico
Wendy A Vogt, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

8:30 a.m.
Enforced Invisibility: Migrant Lives in an Era of Prevention through Deterrence
Robin C Reineke, University of Arizona, School of Anthropology

8:45 a.m.
The Enigma of Arrival: Migrants and the Expression of Circumscribed Temporality
Charles Watters, University of Sussex

9:00 a.m.
Central American Migrants’ Preparatory Body Techniques: a View of the Journey North from Southern Mexico
Sarah B Horton, University of Colorado Denver and Cecilia M Rivas, Univ. California Santa Cruz

9:15 a.m.
Encounters of Violence and Care: Transit Migration through Sinaloa, Mexico
Heide Castaneda, University of South Florida and Kristin E Yarris, University of Oregon

Friday, November 20, 2015

8:00-9:45 a.m.
MIGRATION AND EDUCATION IN THE US: Fa.m.ILIAR/STRANGE TENSIONS IN LIVED REALITIES AND IMAGINED FUTURES
https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogrampreliminary/Session15072.html

This panel explores the ways in which various migrants (immigrants, refugees, asylees, international students) make sense of their lives and educational possibilities in the United States. Drawing together three generations of scholars whose work focuses on a variety of migrant groups, we consider how the field has shifted over time.

8:00 a.m.
Hmong American Youth Revisited: Still Ideologically Blackened?
Stacey J Lee, University of Wisconsin-Madison

8:15 a.m.
Educational Migration and South Asian Diasporic Identities
Susan Thomas, American University

8:30 a.m.
Education for Refugees in New York City
Lesley Bartlett, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Ameena Ghaffar-Kucher, University of Pennsylvania, and Mary Mendenhall, Teachers College, Columbia University

8:45 a.m.
“We Were Expecting a Good Life Here but All We Found Was More Suffering”: Refugee Youth, Citizenship Education, and the American Dream Denied
Sally Wesley Bonet, Rutgers University

9:00 a.m.
“It’s Hard to Know about the Education Anymore”: Refugee Youth Transitions in Philadelphia’s Public Schools
Julia A. McWilliams, University of Pennsylvania

9:15 a.m.
Discussant
Thea R Abu El-Haj, Rutgers University

10:15 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
THE ASYLUM INDUSTRY: TRUTH-MAKING, EXPERTISE, PROFIT AND PRIVATIZATION
https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogrampreliminary/Session15042.html

Since the 1951 establishment of the United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, asylum has become an international legal norm. while the power to grant or deny asylum claims remains strictly within the purview of States, the existing global mobility regime has become increasingly characterized by profit-making activity. Corporations run private detention centers and manage deportations of rejected claimants. Contractors erect walls and fences, preventing potential asylum seekers from entering territories to make their claim. How is the asylum industry closed off to potential applicants through newly-erected barriers of structure, mobility, and identity? Whose testimonies are accorded value—broadly understood—in the asylum industry?

10:15 a.m.
Unacceptably Queer? Regulating LGBT Asylum Seekers in the Nonprofit Sector
Siobhan E McGuirk, American University

10:30 a.m.
Exceptional Asylum: The Politics of Life in Constructing North Korean Deservingness
Joowon Park, Skidmore College

10:45 a.m.
The Moral Economy of Asylum, an "Expert" Perspective
Adrienne Pine, American University, Department of Anthropology

11:00 a.m.
The Graphic Artifacts of Suffering: Form I-589 and Witness Affidavit in the US Asylum Bureaucracy
Tina Shrestha, Leiden University

11:15 a.m.
Discussant
Juan Thomas Ordonez, Universidad del Rosario

BEYOND INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION IN MIGRATION POLITICS
https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogrampreliminary/Session13962.html

Topics include issues of heterogeneity in relationships between “immigrant” and “host” in a multiracial context in the U.S.; the multidialectal power of short, humorous stories, or barzellette, in the Northern Italian region of Veneto; discourse about migration, produced by nonmigrants in Mexico; US students’ metacommentary on “international students” versus “locals” on campuses; and migrants’ identity construction as “acceptable citizens” in online video-recorded narratives posted by the Dreamers’ movement.

10:15 a.m.
Blurring Boundaries: Exclusion and Inclusion in Racialized Joke-Telling in Veneto, Northern Italy
Sabina M Perrino, Binghamton University, Department of Anthropology

10:30 a.m.
Why Are You so Racist There?: Making and Moving Boundaries in Talk of Migration
Hilary Parsons Dick, Arcadia University

10:45 a.m.
Heterogeneous Othering: Positioning Black and Mexican Residents in a New Latino Diaspora Town
Stanton E F Wortham, University of Pennsylvania and Briana Nichols, University of Pennsylvania

11:00 a.m.
Gathering Everyday Metacommentary: A Methodology to Counteract Asian Lumping
Andrea Renee Leone, University of Pennsylvania and Betsy Rymes, University of Pennsylvania

11:15 a.m.
What Is Your Dream?: Fashioning the Migrant Self
Anna De Fina, Georgetown University and Amelia Tseng, American University

11:30 a.m.
Through the Eyes of a Cop: The Interpretation of Gestures and Speech of a Non-Native Speaker Defendant
Norma Mendoza-Denton, University of California

11:45 a.m.
Discussant
Susan Gal, University of Chicago

1:45-3:30 p.m.
ESTRANGING THE Fa.m.ILIAR: RACISM, IMMIGRATION, AND NATION MAKING IN THE EVERYDAY
https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogrampreliminary/Session14623.html

Mass migrations from the global “South” have resulted in widespread and coordinated efforts to curb immigration to industrialized nations. This panel explores race-centered reactions to migration in a comparative perspective. We examine a range of responses—from the organized efforts of the Minutemen in Southern California, to the experiences of Iranian immigrants in Sweden, to the connections that Japanese Dominicans draw between whiteness and citizenship—to highlight how the boundaries of inclusion and belonging are reinforced, challenged, and transformed.

1:45 p.m.
Criollo Japonese: Race, Belonging and Claims to Dominican Identity
Yadira Perez Hazel, BMCC CUNY

2:00 p.m.
"Whiteness Is New Here": Immigrant Activism and Racial Formations Among Iranians in Sweden and the U.S
Amy Malek, University of California, Los Angeles

2:15 p.m.
Off the Edge of Europe: Estranging Racialization in Everyday Life
Uli Linke, Rochester Institute of Technology

2:30 p.m.
Foreign or Familiar? Domestic Workers, Middle-Class Homes, and the Limits of "Americanness"
Susanna Rosenbaum, CUNY

2:45 p.m.
Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don’t: Changing Fertility Patterns and the Latino Threat Narrative
Leo R Chavez, University of California, Irvine

3:00 p.m.
Strangely Familiar: Anti-Immigrant Border Patrols, Vigilantism, and Police Violence as White Supremacy
Devin T Molina, Bronx Community College - CUNY

3:15 p.m.
Discussant
Paul Silverstein, Reed College, Department of Anthropology

Saturday, November 21, 2015

8:00-9:45 a.m.
INTIMATE STRANGERS: UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRATIONS, THE NATIONAL IMAGINATION, AND EXPLOITATION
https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogrampreliminary/Session14772.html

This panel examines how undocumented status serves to legitimize exploitation and the withholding of basic human, labor, and social rights from immigrants in the United States. Living in the shadows, yet also critical to U.S. economy and society, undocumented immigrants constitute a hidden, but known, population whose labor subsidizes citizens’ privileges.

8:00 a.m.
The Use of Rural and Transnational Migrant Geographies in Legal Aid Practice
Bryan Moorefield, Brown University

8:15 a.m.
The New Normal: Wage Theft in the Denver, Construction Industry
Rebecca B Galemba, University of Denver, Josef Korbel School of International Studies

8:30 a.m.
Intimate Indifference: Mixed Status Families and U.S. Immigration Processing
Ruth M Gomberg-Munoz, Loyola University of Chicago

8:45 a.m.
A Strange and Curious Tale from the Nation of Immigrants: Day Laborers on a Path to Nowhere
Juan Thomas Ordonez, Universidad del Rosario

9:00 a.m.
Freed from the Social Fabric: The Immigrants That Everybody Likes
David Griffith, East Carolina University,Department of Anthropology

9:15 a.m.
Discussant
Guillermina Nunez, University of Texas, El Paso

4:00-5:45 p.m.
COSMOPOLITANISM IN LIFESTYLE MIGRATION COMMUNITIES
https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogrampreliminary/Session14399.html

Over the last 10 years, international lifestyle marketers have promoted lifestyle destinations in developing countries (especially in South East Asia and in Central and South America) for migrants from the Global North. This form of migration is an important site for empirical exploration of actually existing cosmopolitanism, or cosmopolitization, which might exhibit certain symbols of cultural openness, but which is built on foundations of economic, political and symbolic inequalities

4:00 p.m.
The Gringo Invasion: Some Anthropological Reflections on Sharing the Field with American Retirees
Ann Miles, Western Michigan University

4:15 p.m.
Imagining Cotacachi: a Critical Perspective on Land and Health Care Access in Lifestyle Migration
Maria Amelia Viteri, University of San Francisco, Quito (USFQ)

4:30 p.m.
The Cosmopolitan Cultures of Lifestyle Migrants: Social Distinction Vs. Culture As a Separate Sphere
Matthew F Hayes, St. Thomas University

4:45 p.m.
Cosmopolitan Imaginaries and Emplacement in Coastal Jalisco, Mexico
Jennifer A Cardinal, University of New Mexico

5:00 p.m.
Discussant
Karen E Stocker, CSU Fullerton

Sunday, November 22, 2015

8:00-9:45 a.m.
SPACES OF EXPULSION: SOCIALITY, BELONGING, AND INTIMATE (DIS)ATTACHMENTS IN THE AFTERMATHS OF FORCED MIGRATION
https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogrampreliminary/Session14181.html

This panel brings together ethnographic perspectives on risk, management, and governance in processes of transnational forced migration. Drawing from a range of geographic regions, including Jamaica, Turkey, Cambodia, the Dominican Republic, and the US-Mexico borderlands, the panel explores various modes of state intervention, control, and regulation (including self-surveillance) of migrants in transit, as well as protean forms of sociality and subjectivity that have emerged among uprooted populations in response to these new structures and dynamics.

8:00 a.m.
Discussant
Nina F Siulc, Rutgers - New Brunswick

8:15 a.m.
Discussant
Whitney L Duncan, University of Northern Colorado

8:30 a.m.
Social-Positioning As Risk Management: Sociality in the Everyday Lives of Afghan Migrants and Refugees in Turkey
Esra Kaytaz, University of Oxford

8:45 a.m.
Graduated Citizenship in the Aftermath of Deportation
Caroline Mary Parker, Columbia Univ.

9:00 a.m.
Deportation As Arrival - Deported Migrants in Kingston, Jamaica
Luke de Noronha, University of Oxford

9:15 a.m.
Expired and Expelled: Chronic Illness and Return Migration in Mexico's Northern Borderlands
Heather Wurtz, Columbia University

9:30 a.m.
Rubbles of War: The Afterlife of Refugees and Border Camps in Cambodia
Elmer Vergara Malibiran, New School For Social Research

Return to TOP


********
********

19.
Learning from Others and its Limits: Migration Management and Integration Policy in an International Comparison

Tuesday-Wednesday, November 24-25, 2015
Schloss Herrenhausen Conference Centre
Herrenhauser Straße 5
30419 Hanover, Germany
https://www.volkswagenstiftung.de/en/events/calendar-of-events/details-of-events/news/detail/artikel/international-conference-learning-from-others-and-its-limits/marginal/4750.html

Programme:

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

6:00-7:30 p.m.
Opening lecture: Making Immigration Work: How Europe Can Overcome its Immigration Crisis
Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

9:00–9:30 a.m.
Welcome and introduction to the theme of the 6th SVR Annual Report

Christine Langenfeld, Chairwoman of the Expert Council, University of Goettingen
Wilhelm Krull, Secretary General of the Volkswagen Foundation, Hanover

9:30–11:00 a.m.
Panel 1: Labour migration policy

Herbert Brücker, Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg
Thomas Liebig, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris
Thomas K. Bauer, Member of the Expert Council, University of Bochum

Moderator:
Holger Kolb, SVR-Berlin Office

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Panel 2: Asylum and refugee policy

Irene Ponzo, International and European Forum on Migration Research, Turin
Dagmar Soennecken, York University, Toronto
Ludger Pries, Member of the Expert Council, University of Bochum

Moderator:
Cornelia Schu, SVR-Berlin Office

2:00–3:30 p.m.
Panel 3: Citizenship and political participation

Jürgen Mackert, University of Potsdam
Ayelet Shachar, University of Toronto
Gianni D‘Amato, Member of the Expert Council, University of Neuchatel

Moderator:
Martin Weinmann, SVR-Berlin Office

4:00–5:30 p.m.
Panel 4: Index studies as a comparison tool in migration research

Ruud Koopmans, Berlin Social Science Center
Jan Niessen, Migration Policy Group, Brussels
Thomas Huddleston, Migration Policy Group, Brussels
Heinz Faßmann, Member of the Expert Council, University of Vienna

Moderator:
Alex Wittlif, SVR-Berlin Office

5:30–6:00 p.m.
Closing remarks
Christine Langenfeld, Chairwoman of the Expert Council, University of Goettingen

Wilhelm Krull, Secretary General of the Volkswagen Foundation, Hanover

Return to TOP


********
********

20.
Comparative Responses to Asylum Seeking in Europe, Australia, the U.S., and Middle East

9:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m., Monday, November 30, 2015
Meeting Rooms on Fifteen, 15-A
University of California, San Diego
9450 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92092-0100
http://ccis.ucsd.edu/category/events/research-seminars/

Speakers:
Philippe De Bruycker, Professor, Université Libre de Bruxelles

Claire Higgins, Research Associate, Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law, University of New South Wales

Karen Musalo, Director, Center for Gender and Refugee Studies, UC Hastings

David FitzGerald, Professor of Sociology, UCSD

Yen Espiritu, Professor of Ethnic Studies, UCSD

Ev Meade, Director of the Trans-Border Institute, USD

Raphi Rechitsky, Visiting Scholar, CCIS

Rawan Arar, PhD Candidate in Sociology, UCSD

Kelsey Norman, PhD Candidate in Political Science, UCI

Return to TOP


********
********

21.
The Residential Decisions of Unauthorized Migrants: Hiding within American Racial Hierarchies

12:00-1:30 p.m., Thursday, December 3, 2015
Department of Sociology
William James Hall, Room 601
33 Kirkland Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
http://sociology.fas.harvard.edu/event/asad-l-asad-residential-decisions-unauthorized-migrants-hiding-within-american

Speaker:
Asad L. Asad, Ph.D. Candidate in Sociology at Harvard University

Return to TOP


********
********

22.
4th World BORDERPOL Congress

Tuesday-Thursday, December 8-10, 2015
Crowne Plaza Den Haag Promenade
Van Stolkweg 1
2585 JL Den Haag
The Hague, Netherlands
http://www.world-borderpol-congress.com/

Conference program to be added soon.

Return to TOP



********




 

The Center for Immigration Studies is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit research organization founded in 1985. It is the nation's only think tank devoted exclusively to research and policy analysis of the economic, social, demographic, fiscal, and other impacts of immigration on the United States.