So when they say jump...

a list

edited by stacy-marie ishmael

I think a lot about email. Beyond subject lines, beyond open rates, beyond click throughs. I think a lot about how email and "what I have to do today" so often overlap (and indeed, contradict each other). I think a lot about how the urgent becomes the important; about my pavlovian response to unread messages; about the months-old drafts to friends vs the near real-time replies to colleagues.

When I am properly disciplined about it, I write 500 words before I ever look at my inbox. Create more than you consume.



On to the main event.
 

Engage

James Altucher, professional polemicist, reflects on how to quit your job:
For the entire prior eight months I had diversified my possible outcomes. Every day I had tried every possible way to get a job. Everybody rejected me for everything. I probably tried 20 different ways to create the job of my dreams. Finally one thing worked. One thing got me lucky. I bonded on some random thing with a decision maker. But in chess there is a saying, “only the good players get lucky”..

Learn

'Research, workout, or write down your thoughts each morning. Don’t check email, as that’s paying someone else':
This isn’t a new concept, as many financial advisers will suggest that you invest in your future (funds, roth, 401) before fully paying down your debt. In the long run, your compounded growth of investing in larger payoffs will yield a greater nest egg. This same concept applies to how you spend your time, each morning.

Connect

I'm in London, and on Tuesday night will be hosting a meetup of the London-based #awesomewomen at Cotton's in Exmouth Market. If you've RSVPd, looking forward to meeting you. Otherwise, I'm in town till Saturday if anyone is interested in coffee / tea / breakfast.

Till next time.

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