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Viewpoints for Leadership Intelligence
April 2014, Issue 13
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'7 Habits of Highly Effective People' 

A Brief Summary of Covey's Best Selling Book

Stephen R. Covey’s bestselling book “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” states that a person’s character is more or less a composite of that person’s habits. He said his first three habits make up the â€œprivate victory,” where people start to take responsibility for their own lives. The next three habits make up the “public victory,” where people learn to succeed with other people. The seventh habit, meanwhile, makes all the other habits possible. The seven habits of effectiveness as identified by Covey are being proactive; beginning with the end in mind; putting first things first; seeking to understand, then be understood; thinking “win/win”; synergizing; and self-renewal.


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'The Little BIG Things: 163 Ways to Pursue Excellence'
 

Tom Peters, author of “The Little BIG Things: 163 Ways to Pursue Excellence,” published an abridged, PDF version of his 538-page book. He said this shortened edition lists all 163 items contained in the actual book, but it forgoes 90 percent of the “How to’s,” as well as the rationale for those â€œHow to’s.” His little big things are the result of more than 40 years of living and working in and observing organizations, and he claimed that the absence of these little ideas are often at the root of organizational failures and personal pratfalls. Some of his observations include paying attention to the cleanliness of an organization’s restrooms and the importance of a high-quality workforce.

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'Crucial Confrontations: Tools for Resolving Broken Promises, Violated Expectations and Bad Behavior'
An Executive Book Summary


Janelle Keller published an executive summary of a book titled “Crucial Confrontations: Tools for Resolving Broken Promises, Violated Expectations and Bad Behavior.” She said the book discussed ways to have difficult conversations at work in a way that can be applied to all types of relationships. Keller said that throughout the book, the authors talk about results of a 25,000-person study that found the most effective people in their companies are often those who are “the best at stepping up to colleagues, co-workers, or even their bosses, and holding them accountable.” When people are not held accountable, they begin a process known as soldiering, which is purposely working below one’s capacity.


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"The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing."
                                                                                                   
                                                                                    —Stephen Covey
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