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TOP STORIES TODAY

Israel-UAE deal: The two-(police)-state solution (Middle East Eye)

"Before the normalisation agreement between Israel and the UAE, the two countries had a history of cooperation on surveillance activities."

"In 2016, award-winning Emirati human rights defender Ahmed Mansoor - who is now serving a 10-year prison sentence in the United Arab Emirates for such unspeakable crimes as insulting the “status and prestige of the UAE and its symbols,” including its leaders - was the victim of a hacking attempt by NSO Group, an Israel-based cyber warfare firm."

"This, mind you, was four years before the normalisation of UAE-Israeli relations last month - the culmination of a longstanding, secret love affair between the Middle Eastern federation of sheikhdoms and the Zionist state known for habitually massacring Palestinians and otherwise tormenting the Emiratis’ fellow Arabs."

What is behind Bahrain's normalisation deal with Israel? (Al Jazeera)

"Twenty-six years after Bahrain welcomed an Israeli delegation for the first time, the small Gulf archipelago last week became the latest Arab country to agree to normalise its relationship with Israel."

"Even though regional heavyweight and Iran's archenemy Saudi Arabia has so far signalled it is not ready to take the same step itself, analysts say the recent deals would not have happened without its support. Bahrain's political agenda is "pretty much dictated by Saudi Arabia", according to Marwa Fatafta, a policy member with the Palestinian policy network Al-Shabaka."

"On Sunday, Bahrain's top Shia leader Ayatollah Sheikh Isa Qassim, who lives abroad, rejected the recent normalisation deals with Israel and urged people in the region to resist. Bahrain is the Gulf monarchy "most at odds with its own people", argued Rabbani, co-editor of Jadaliyya publication."

In DC for peace deal, Netanyahu’s son tweets in support of Duma killer (The Times of Israel)

"Hours after Amiram Ben Uliel received three life sentences plus 20 years on Monday for the 2015 murder of three, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s son Yair criticized the conviction and retweeted a link to a crowdfunding page for his continued legal battle."

"Ben Uliel killed three members of the Dawabsha family — Saad, Riham, and their 18-month-old son Ali — in an arson attack. Only the couple’s eldest son, Ahmed, survived, despite terrible burns and scarring; he was 5-years-old at the time."

"Critics on Twitter called Netanyahu’s retweet of the fundraiser “surreal,” especially in light of the fact that his father was set to sign normalization agreements with the UAE and Bahrain on Tuesday in Washington. Yair Netanyahu is accompanying his father on the trip to the US."

Stepping up direct action for Palestine (Mondoweiss)

Adie Mormech, member of new UK group Palestine Action, speaks about their campaign against UK sites of Israeli weapons company Elbit Systems:

"As Palestine activists a big question we have to ask ourselves is – what actually causes Israel’s war machine harm? What threatens Israel’s arms industry and complicit companies in a Western country?"

"Most of the organizing for Palestine in our Western countries is too comfortable. Too much of what is defined as activism and solidarity with the Palestinian struggle for freedom and justice has been in the form of angry facebook posts to a limited circle of friends or listening to talks where we learn a little bit more than we already know."

"I was in Gaza for two years and I will never forget my time in Al Shifa central hospital during Israel’s 8-day bombing in November 2012. Burnt bodies, children dying in the intensive care unit, entire families wiped out."

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