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Educating for Democracy

Newsletter  |  April 4th, 2018
Welcome to the first edition of the Educating for Democracy Newsletter. This periodic newsletter highlights new resources that promote equitable civic education for the digital age and shares recently added materials to the Teaching Channel’s Educating for Democracy Dive. If you are not already signed up for this newsletter, you can do so here. You can also follow us at @Ed4Democracy.

New Resources on the Teaching Channel’s Educating for Democracy Deep Dive

We have all witnessed an impressive array of youth civic engagement recently related to pressing issues such as gun control, systemic racism, sexual assault, and immigration to name a few. Young people’s efforts to respond to these challenges have spurred many to see the ever increasing importance of civic education in schools in order to promote young people’s thoughtful and effective participation in democracy. In response, the Educating for Democracy Deep Dive was launched in November 2017 in partnership with the Teaching Channel. It provides educators with videos, resources, and readings focused on high-quality civic learning in the digital age.

A new essential question was just added to the Deep Dive focused on: How do I assess my students’ civic learning? This collection of resources will help educators find ways to assess students’ civic learning in a variety of projects. You can also read the four new blog posts listed below and learn about a variety of tools for assessing students’ online civic reasoning, civic writing, civic presentations, and their performance on civic projects.

Read Young Whan Choi’s blog post to learn how Oakland, CA teachers assess student learning in a graduate capstone project where students research an issue they care about, conduct field research, write a research paper, and present in front of a panel of school and community members.
The Stanford History Education Group (SHEG)’s blog post describes their short assessments of civic online reasoning — the ability to effectively search for and evaluate social and political information online — that can help students learn questions and strategies for evaluating online information.
Engaging Youth in Civic Action Through Writing

To learn more about writing as a form of civic debate, dialogue, and engagement check out the blog post
and the Civically Engaged Writing Analysis Continuum (CEWAC) rubric developed by the National
Writing Project.

Supporting Students in Developing Persuasive Policy Arguments

If you’d like to learn about how to assess students’ ability to develop and present a persuasive and evidence-based policy argument at the culmination of a civic inquiry project, read the Measure of Youth Policy Arguments (MYPA) rubric designed to provide formative and summative support to educators engaging youth in action civics or participatory action research.

More Resources:

For educators wondering how to support student learning related to the recent youth civic engagement in the wake of gun violence in Parkland, check out these 5 resources:

About the Educating for Democracy Newsletter: This periodic newsletter highlights new resources that promote equitable civic education for the digital age and shares recently added materials to the Teaching Channel’s Educating for Democracy Deep Dive.  If you are not already signed up to get this newsletter, you can do so here.
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