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All things responsive, all of the time. (View in browser.)
Going retro with the old images Trent & Jeremy

Hello


Hello and welcome to RWD Weekly edition 192 and the final edition of the 2015 responsive interview series. This week we're lucky to hear from Trent Walton and Jeremy Keith who also shared their thoughts back in 2013.

Last week I shared a discount code for the SVG Summit and I hope you were lucky enough to take part. I caught Sarah Drasner's talk on Complex SVG Animations and WOW, if was amazing! If you're not familiar with Sarah's Code Pen work you should definitely check it out.

Enough of that though, lets hear what Trent and Jeremy have to say.
 

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Back in 2012 I asked the same 4 questions to a small number of people that contribute consistently to the community through the way of writing and speaking and building out demo's for us to all follow. This year I've asked them to answer those same questions 3 years down the line... lets see what they have to say.
 

Trent Walton

Trent is the founder & 1/3 of the brilliant team from Paravel, a small web design and branding shop out of Austin, Texas that works on BIG things (their work has been featured by others throughout the series). When Trent isn’t working on client work you can find him blogging some great articles on his personal blog TrentWalton.com. You can follow his @TrentWalton
 

What was the best new implementation of RWD you saw in 2015, and was there a redesign that took your eye?

 
The continual iteration and experimentation happening at The Guardian is inspiring. Their Developer Blog is great because they’re sharing a lot about how they do what they do. They recently built an offline page and open sourced their image management service.
 
I always love to see what adventurous layout the dConstruct page will have each year
 
I find the restraint and polish demonstrated in some if the article layouts refreshing.
 
The same goes for the folks at Vox. Some of their recent enhanced article layouts and posts about how they were made have been fantastic.
 

What are 2 RWD Frameworks/Plugins/Shims/patterns that you always seem to go to?

The picture element (with the picturefill polyfill in most cases) makes its way into just about every project we work on. Flexbox has come in handy frequently as well—less for overall layout, mostly for micro-improvements to a site, like vertically centering text alongside an image.


What is the one thing with sites you would like to see improved/developed in 2016?


I’m excited about how content blockers have amplified the need for online ads to be better. It’s been a mess for years, and the shakeup has created a lot of opportunity for new methods and philosophies.
 

If you could offer 1 piece of advice around building responsively what would it be?


Prototype! The need for different disciplines and skill-sets to collaborate is only going to increase, and I’ve found the best way to do that is to build together. It helps align perspectives early on, and reduces the likelihood that someone becomes over-protective of their own ideas b/c they worked independently for too long.
 
Jeremy is one of my favourite people working on the web. He always has time to chat in between conference sessions, is always writing amazing articles on his website, facilitates Indie Web Camps and generally goes out of his way to make working on the web and the industry much more enjoyable. You should definitely follow him on @adactio.
 

What was the best new implementation of RWD you saw in 2015, and was there a redesign that took your eye?


Well, design-wise, I have to say that I loved the dConstruct site: http://2015.dconstruct.org/

I know that it's a bit cheeky for me to say that, seeing as it was a Clearleft production, but I didn't have anything to do with it, and I am genuinely impressed with the execution.

I particularly like that the richness of the design hasn't compromised the dedication to performance.
 

What are 2 RWD Frameworks/Plugins/Shims/patterns that you always seem to go to?

 
Every responsive site I build has this hack in the HTML:

<meta name="viewport" value="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">

It's a hack because it's presentational information shoved into markup. We should be doing this in CSS. And we will ...when the CSS viewport selector is better supported.

Apart from that, there's nothing specific to responsive design that I include in every project by default. Every site is different.
 

What is the one thing with sites you would like to see improved/developed in 2016?


Performance, performance, performance.

On a related note, I'd really like it if sites didn't make their core functionality (like, say, reading some text) dependent on the user downloading, parsing, and executing a shit-ton of JavaScript.
 

If you could offer 1 piece of advice around building responsively what would it be?


I think that even now, there's still a tendency for people to think of the desktop view as the default, and the small-screen view as the exception. That's a recipe for frustration.

Think about your content first (whether it's a task or it's information) in the absence of any screen.

Then think about that content on a small, constrained screen.

Finally, allow yourself to think about that content in the context of a larger screen.

 



That's all for this week and for the entire Responsive Design Interview series for another while. I'd like to thank all of the contributors once again for taking the time out of your busy schedules to share your thoughts and experiences... it has been greatly appreciated by myself and the other subscribers.
 

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That's all from me, thank you for subscribing and I'll see you next week when we resume the regular newsletter packed with lots of great links from the xmas break.

Cheers,

Justin.

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