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Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

July 2016


New Video
The Case for Science-Based Innovation 
Innovation in Action
Building Families' Skills
New Research
Key Findings from Breakthrough Impacts Report
Social Media
A Twitter milestone
Media Coverage 
More Resources
Follow on Twitter
Subscribe on YouTube
Visit our website

New Video

The Case for Science-Based Innovation in Early Childhood

The Case for Science-Based Innovation in Early Childhood

"How do we take the best of what we're doing right now and say, in a constructive way, 'It's not good enough'?" That's the question that Jack Shonkoff, Director of the Center on the Developing Child, poses in a new, 2-minute video. Learn what's at the heart of the Center's mission: using cutting-edge science and an R&D approach to not just make progress against the most challenging problems facing children and families today, but to achieve breakthroughs. Because, as Dr. Shonkoff says, once you understand the science and how preventable—and not inevitable—most of the problems in the world are, "It is impossible to walk away."  

Get inspired: Watch the new video

Innovation in Action

Building Families' Skills to Move Out of Poverty

The Intergenerational Mobility Project
How does poverty affect families? How can we use science to break its too-often intergenerational cycle? A report released today from EMPath answers these questions and lays out a fundamentally different approach to addressing poverty's effects. The Intergenerational Mobility Project, part of the Center's Frontiers of Innovation community, is grounded in a deep understanding of how children develop in an environment of relationships and how the ability of parents to meet their own life goals is inextricably intertwined with the well-being of their children. Read the new report, Families Disrupting the Cycle of Poverty: Coaching with an Intergenerational Lens, to see how EMPath is working to move entire families forward together.

Learn more about the Intergen Project and download the report

New Research

From Best Practices to Breakthrough Impacts: Key Findings

From Best Practices to Breakthrough Impacts: Key Findings
If you haven't had a chance to read the full 50-page From Best Practices to Breakthrough Impacts report yet, you can now access the report's Key Findings in a new 5-page brief on the report's download page. The Center's latest report presents a call to action to launch a new era of R&D in policy and practice in order to dramatically improve outcomes for young children and families. 

Download the Key Findings

Social Media

Ten Thousand Twitter Followers!

Thank you to everyone who follows us on Twitter, shares and likes our posts, and helps spread our vision of breakthrough outcomes for children driven by science-based innovation.

Follow @HarvardCenter

Latest Media Coverage

"The Complex Lives of Babies"

The Atlantic | June 20, 2016
Highlighting ideas and themes from the recently released documentary, "The Beginning of Life," the story includes quotes from Center Director Jack Shonkoff and affiliated faculty member and National Scientific Council on the Developing Child member Charles Nelson.
 

"Stress Fractures: A developing brain exposed to a stressful environment can cause a lifetime of pain"

Real Change | June 15, 2016
This story highlights several new programs aimed at preventing and reducing toxic stress for children and features insight from National Scientific Council on the Developing Child member Megan Gunnar.

See all recent coverage

More Resources

Building Core Capabilities for Life

REPORT:
Building Core Capabilities
for Life
8 Things to Remember about Child Development

BRIEF:
8 Things to Remember about Child Development
The Resilience Game

TOOL:
The Resilience Game

 
Serve and Return

KEY CONCEPT:
Serve and Return
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