A Florida Black Bear travels through the Highlands County region. Photo by Carlton Ward, Jr. 
Florida Black Bear Showcases Need for Wildlife Corridors

Ever wonder what motivated the team to dedicate their lives to the Florida Wildlife Corridor mission?

Wildlife Biologist, Joe Guthrie, began studying and tracking Florida Black Bears for his graduate thesis with the University of Kentucky in 2006. A few years later in 2009, Joe and his colleagues tracked a Florida Black Bear known as M34 with GPS. M34's movements started near Sebring, but over the corse of two months marched north all the way to Interstate 4 before having to turn around. M34 was unable to cross the busy roadway of Interstate 4 and had to travel all the way back down to Lake Okeechobee and Fisheating Creek, not far from where he started his journey. 

Check out a short three minute video all about Joe and Florida Black Bear, M34. 

The inability for wildlife to move and exchange genes into different populations makes animals susceptible to diseases and inbreeding. Therefore, conservation easements and federally protected lands are critical to healthy wildlife populations in the state of Florida. 

Want to get involved? Like our Facebook page (link is located on the right) in or make a tax deductible and secure donation at our link below. Every little bit helps preserve our wildlife for future generations!
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UPCOMING EVENTS
Corridor Conservation Series Panel Discussion & Film Screening

August 21 @ 6p - 9p

Indian River State College
Okeechobee, FL

Click here for more information.
Final Corridor Conservation Series

August 28 @ 6p - 9p

Chinsegut Hill in Brooksville, FL

Click here for more information.
SAVE THE DATE!
 
The 1st Annual "Trail Mixer" will be held on September 25 at 7:00p.
Click here to register. 
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