Cerena writes to help new gardeners get started,
remind experienced gardeners to plant at the best times, inspire us to try new techniques!  Being outdoors gardening is healthy
for our bodies and spirits, provides the most nutritious organic veggies right on your table with no food miles at all! 


Green Bean Connection

Hope you had a grand Earth Day!
Happy May Day and Mother's Day! 
 

MAY - Beauty and Bounty!
Grow Delicious and Amazing Edible Perennials!
Vermicomposting for Worm Castings!
Seattle's Urban Food Forest Open For Foraging this Summer!

Events! Master Gardener Talks, Tour, Botanic Garden, Food Forests, Fermenting!


Dear Pilgrim Terrace Gardeners, Garden Friends,


Reporting our first tomatoes! Hoanh has almost two inchers, and Mary and Kevin aren't far behind! This extra warm weather will bring red ones well before July.

Don't you love Louis Cassano's scarecrow couple! He says they were tossed over the fence and he rescued them!

We're delighted Chris White is back! He had Plot 24, that has now been leveled and is brimming with amendments! It is ready for planting, plus trellises and cages going in soon! He, and his sweetie Christine Hogan - welcome, are also planting at Plot 49, the 2nd set of 3 boxes by the gate. They have planted a model of biodiversity! No monoculture for them! Between them and Owen Hanavan, Plot 50, it's a pleasure to walk into the Garden!

So happy Ambrosio weeded Plot 35 yesterday. Looks like Pete Andrach and friends will be enjoying their superlative zucchinis again soon!

Please hold Susanna Brandan, Plot 40, in your loving thoughts.

If you or a friend would like to garden at a community garden, get going right now - this is PRIME planting time! 'Buy one plot, get another one 1/2 price!' YES! Go directly to the Louise Lowry Davis Center, Parks & Recreation office, to sign up. That's at 1232 De La Vina St, Santa Barbara.
 


May - Beauty and Bounty!

Summer Veggies Harvest and Flowers
Love your Mother! Plant more bee food! Eat less meat. Grow organic!

A late start in our coastal SoCal gardens is not a problem! Plant the same as you would in April plus now is perfect time for cantaloupes! If you are doing winter squash this year, better from transplants now. If your garden has had soil fungi that sickened your tomatoes, a later start is to your advantage. The soil has had time to warm and dry a bit, killing off some of that fungi. Those of you that did late March, early April plantings, plant your 2nd rounds now or later in the month! 

It's still good timing to sow seeds of lima and snap beans, beets, cantaloupe, carrots, celery, chard, chicory, chives, slo-bolt cilantro, corn, leeks, warm-season lettuces, melons, okras, green onions, peanuts, peppers, pumpkins, soybeans, warm-season spinaches, squashes, sweet potatoes, and tomatoes.  At the same time put in transplants of what you can get, and you will have two successive plantings in at once! Choose bolt resistant, heat and drought tolerant varieties when you can.

Smart Companion Planting! WHITE radishes with cucumbers repel cucumber beetles. Interplant cucumbers and beans to repel cucumber beetles and prevent the wilt diseases they carry plant to plant. Cucumber beetles are literally deadly; they are NOT cute. Plant your cukes on mounds with a little well on top; alternate with beans planted low next to them. The both need plenty of water, but the cukes need the soil to dry bit to help keep the wilt away. Water carefully so as not to degrade the mound/well. Check them time to time and restore if they need it. If you will be pickling, tuck in a couple lovely dills here or there. When they flower, they are perfect bee food. 

DIVA Cucumbers!
 All America Selections winner, Diva has only female flowers, so produces more fruit. Diva is smooth skinned, originated in the Middle East. Fruits are quite crisp, very sweet, never bitter. Even the foliage is nonbitter, so not as attractive to cucumber beetles as some varieties. I deeply pray that is true! But I do hear, online, they don't like heat... I'm trying my first batch this year. Have any of you tried them? How did they do?

Also plant radishes with eggplants as a trap plant for flea beetles. Flea beetle damage, little pin holes, seems so less severe, but it slows the growth of your plant way down, and there is little production. Plant your favorite varieties of potatoes to repel squash bugs. 

Long beans like it really hot. Wait until June to plant them.  Also, they are the last bean producers, filling in at the end of summer when your other beans are finishing.  When they are happy, you won't believe how quickly they get that long! Certain varieties don't get mildews!  Their taste and texture is slightly different than our standard green beans, but delish also! 

I hope you planted your garlic, bulb onions, and shallots in their own little patch, because later this month, when foliage begins to dry naturally, stop irrigating. Dry outer layers needed for long storage will form on the bulbs. When about half of the foliage slumps to the ground naturally, bend the rest to initiate this maturing. The bulbs will be ready for harvest when the foliage is thoroughly dry and crisp.

Healthy everbearing strawberries will be producing like crazy, maybe your June bearers too since we have been having early warm weather! Give them a fish/kelp mix feed, now and after each heavy fruit-bearing period for continued strong growth and fruit set. One of our gardeners fed his every other week and his harvests, in shoe boxes, were outstanding!  Know that fishy stinky stuff also attracts skunks and other foragers, so use something else, like Bunny poop if you can get it. Avoid mulching with salty manures, especially chicken; strawberries don't like it. Water short rooted varieties of strawberries more frequently, as well as keeping your beans and cukes well watered. They are all workhorses producing fast and repeatedly, cukes making a watery fruit even.

In this drought year, summer mulching is an absolute! Self Mulching is the cheapest, easiest technique! Transplant seedlings close enough so that the leaves of mature plants will shade the soil between the plants.  If you choose to do this, alternate plants that get the same diseases or pests with plants that don't get the same diseases or pests. That's all there is too it! Roots are cool and comfy, less water needed. Natural mulches feed your soil as they decompose. Avoid any that have been dyed. Mulch keeps berries, cukes, squashes up off the ground, less likely to be chomped by snails and soil critters. Soil diseases don't have access to susceptible leaves. It prevents soil splash so you have a clean harvest.

Again! TOMATOES! At gardens that have the Fusarium and Verticillium wilts in the soil, choose your tomato varieties with that in mind. Heirlooms don't have as much resistance as the toms that have VFN or VF on their tags or seed packets, like Ace, Early Girl, Champion, Celebrity. The V is for Verticillium, the F Fusarium wilt, N nematodes. Your next choice is whether to buy determinates or indeterminates. Determinates grow about 3 to 4' tall and quit, producing lots of toms all at once, great for canning. Indeterminates vine forever all summer long, fresh table tomatoes every day! If you have soil wilt problems, planting determinates, successively, and replanting (not in the same spot) as you lose plants, may be your best solution. In these times of drought, and you have no soil wilt problems, indeterminates are the way to go so you aren't continually watering plants that aren't producing yet. Unless, of course, you are going to be canning. Special care is needed for tomatoes in wilt infected soils. La Sumida has the largest tomato selection in the Santa Barbara area! 

Reminder ~ Water Wise Practices!
  1. Please always be building compost. Compost increases your soil's water holding capacity.
  2. This California drought year consider planting IN furrows, where the moisture settles and the plants' root areas will be slightly shaded. Rather than losing water to evaporation from overhead watering, put the water right where it will do the most good and nowhere else.
  3. And, PLEASE MULCH. It keeps your soil cooler, moister, less water needed.
  4. Sprinkle Mycorrhiza fungi right on the roots of your transplants when you put them in the ground. They increase uptake of nutrients, water, and phosphorus that helps roots and flowers grow and develop. Ask for them at Island Seed & Feed in Goleta.
Always! Plant Bee Food, Herbs and Flowers! Sow or transplant basil, borage, chervil, chamomile, chives, cilantro, comfrey, dill, fennel, lavender, marjoram, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon, and thyme. Be mindful where you plant them... Mediterranean herbs from southern France, like lavender, marjoram, rosemary, sage, savory, and thyme, do well in hot summer sun and poor but well-drained soil with minimal fertilizer. On the other hand, basil, chives, coriander (cilantro), and parsley thrive in richer soil with more frequent watering. Wise planting puts chives where you need to repel Bagrada Bugs, by your broccoli, kale, but away from peas if you are still growing some. Cilantro, a carrot family workhorse, discourages harmful insects such as aphids, potato beetles and spider mites, attracts beneficial insects when in bloom. Dill is a natural right next to the cucumbers since you will use the dill if you make pickles. They mature about the same time. Let some of your carrots, lettuces, cilantro, broccoli, chard, radish, bloom! Bees, and insect eating birds and beneficial insects love them and you will get some seeds - some for the birds, some for you! Grow beauty - cosmos, marigolds, white sweet alyssum - all benefit your garden in their own way!

Born May 30, 1835, poet Alfred Austin: The glory of gardening: hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden is to feed not just on the body, but the soul.

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Grow Delicious and Amazing Edible Perennials!  

Edible Perennials ~ Vicki Mattern

If you have enough space for them, and for winter and summer favorites and staples as well, they are just the ticket! Save time. No replanting because a perennial is a plant that grows year after year. Lucky for us coastal SoCal gardeners, lots of plants act as perennials here since we have such a temperate climate. As a system that more closely mimics nature, and gives a longer growing season, expect higher yields! One of the beauties of perennial garden plants is they usually only need to be split to start a new plant! Another saving. Pick hardy varieties right for your climate and soil. These days, SoCal gardeners, give special consideration to drought tolerant perennials.

Mediterranean Favorites All those wonderful herbs - marjoram, oregano, rosemary, sage, thyme, winter savory.

There are many edible perennials! Alpine strawberries, asparagus, chives, French sorrel, lavender, lemon grass, peppermint, various peppers, rhubarb, society garlic. 

Would you believe, Artichoke?!

Artichoke Plant Fruit

A type of thistle. Depending on the plant's vitality, commercial growers let them grow 5 to 10 seasons! Full sun, grows well in all soils with compost. Lots of water is required, as well, so water deeply every 2-3 days, but they are drought tolerant once established. They produce about mid-summer, often sending up a second crop in fall. In the very best growing conditions you may be able to harvest artichokes throughout the year. From a well loved 3-5 year old plant you can get dozens and dozens! Gophers do love them, so please protect them - plant i a large basked or do what you do, 'k? When they get big and happy, simply split off the new pups for new plants. The Green Globe cultivar is the variety of choice of California commercial growers, and California produces 100% of all commercially grown artichokes in the United States. We know how to do 'chokes!

Tree Collards, affectionately called TCs

Tree Collards from Africa grow well in Southern California!
'We’re thankful for caritas seeds donators, whose collective action to provide sustainable solutions to hunger serves as a constant blessing for countless families in Kenya!' Women Farmers

It's a full circle. Reputed to come from Africa, and have been propagated and passed on by cuttings within African American communities in this country, especially the Los Angeles area, we are now sending them back to Africa! Ask for cuttings at your local Farmers Market.

They are also called tree cabbages. There are a few varieties, collards, cabbage, kale, that grow slowly on an upright husky central stem. TCs grow 6' tall average, but up to 11 feet! They withstand light frosts, and like some other Brassicas, are reputed to taste sweeter after the frost! 

Brassica family, Tree Collards can thrive for four to five years (and possibly 20 years), it is probably better to rotate them after three years, since they remove so much calcium from the soil. Get new cuttings well started before you remove an old bed. They need full sun and rich, moist soil. See a LOT more about them at http://treecollards.blogspot.com/ Also, Richards Farms has a great info sheet.

Know this: TCs are high in Calcium, and unlike spinach, chard, and beet greens, collard greens don’t contain high amounts of oxalic acid, an anti-nutrient that can deplete your body of important minerals like Iron. Eat them fine chopped in your frittata/quiche, as wraps, steamed over rice, in your tasty bean soup, as a pretty stir fried bed of greens under your protein slices! Finely shredded raw leaves may be added to salads, sandwiches and tacos.

Dragon Fruit Cactus Dessert!

Dragon Fruit Lady, Philippines
May 2012, 66-year-old mother of four, Edita Dacuycuy, was in Malacanang, Philippines, to receive her presidential award as the year’s most outstanding high-value commercial crop farmer. There's more to her Story, about her daughter.

You have to love cacti to appreciate how this plant looks. But the FRUIT! An amazing array of different colors, a delicate taste, textures from creamy to crunchy, a shape that will never bore you! Easy to grow from seeds or starts right here in Santa Barbara CA! Just stuff a segment in the ground, water, and it will grow. Put it near your fence and tie it along the way. True to its cactus forebears, little space, care or water needed.

The Ultimate - Perennial Tree Crops

Four excerpts from Mother Earth News, A Permaculture Farm: The Perennial Revolution of Oikos Tree Crops. A Michigan permaculture farm defies the agricultural status quo by growing in harmony with nature as told by Eran Rhodes:

The Oikos Tree Crops landscape is, in a sense, complete. There are a plethora of nut trees: pecans, walnuts, hazelnuts, hickories, buckeyes and, of course, oaks. There is just about every fruit or berry tree, shrub, vine or crawling groundcover imaginable: nannyberry, bearberry, buffaloberry, snowberry, thimbleberry, and berry much more! And for every type of tree or bush or vine, numerous varieties. The main food staple that has been missing from the food forest is perennial vegetables. 

Besides all the wild edibles that grow as weeds around the property, such as dandelions, clover, plantain, nettles, asparagus, among many others, we are now propagating dozens of other edible plants that can become like weeds, and grow on their own, either as perennials, or by self-seeding. Ken does not follow the general public’s fear of weeds — utilizing and working with nature’s abundant diversity, he has never had one weed take over completely.

Wild varieties of squashes and melons are growing on their own out in the fields, and will hopefully spread on their own in the coming years. Earth peas with their exploding pods will become a permanent edible legume. Perennial wheat and other grasses with edible seeds will slowly replace the aggressive bindweed. Tubers, such as Jerusalem artichokes, groundnuts, chufa, oca, wild mountain yams and others are all thriving. We even have a wild variety of crabgrass that originates in Russia, and we cultivate the seeds for food. We have dozens of perennial salad greens, quinoa (a close relative of the common weed lamb’s-quarters), rhubarb, and even tomatoes and peppers. 

Our model would be the perfect homestead system for anyone interested in truly living off the land with minimal tilling.


This brief write-up is meant as a teaser to intrigue you, disturb some of your thinking! If Perennial Gardening really makes you happy, see Eric Toensmeier's list of all lists of edible perennial plants. Peruse his website for valuable tips! 

May it go well with you and your new Food Forest!

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Vermicomposting for Worm Castings!

Vermicomposting Worm Castings Workshop Vancouver
Since 1990, City Farmer and the City of Vancouver have held worm composting workshops for City of Vancouver residents who live in apartments. For $25 participants get a worm bin, 500 worms, Mary Appelhof's book "Worms Eat My Garbage", a trowel, bedding and a one-hour class. Now that's a deal!

Worm Castings are like BLACK GOLD to your garden, and high quality store-bought castings are just about as expensive! For good reason. They cause seeds to germinate more quickly, seedlings to grow faster, leaves grow bigger, more flowers, fruits or vegetables are produced. Vermicompost suppresses several diseases on cucumbers, radishes, strawberries, grapes, tomatoes and peppers, according to research from Ohio State extension entomologist Clive Edwards. It also significantly reduced parasitic nematodes, aphids, mealy bugs and mites. These effects are greatest when a smaller amount of vermicompost is used—just 10-40% of the total volume of the plant growth medium is all that is needed!

Worms are easy to raise or you can use a complex system. You can start them anytime, indoors or out depending on temps. Here in Santa Barbara mine live outside all year in full sun. They are more active when they are warmer. Non color inked newspaper is often used for bedding to start a clew (colony). Worms are 90% water, so keep the bedding moist. My worms get all the moisture they need from the juicy kitchen bits I feed them and that I cover them with their plastic blankie to keep them moist! 

They like decomposing kitchen waste with the exceptions of spicy, acidic, and meats (too tough). No junk food. Coffee filters, grounds, lightly ripped teabags are good, but not too many of those because they are acidic, and veggies like things a tad alkaline. Things cut into smaller pieces decompose faster. Harder or tougher items take a long time. I don't 'feed' mine avocado pits because they literally can't eat them. They do love the avo shells though and nest in them. Egg shells keep the pH neutral. 

You can easily see when they have run out of food. Feed them sooner than that, or they might be hungry a few days, even die. They eat the bacteria on what you give them. They can't eat raw food until it decomposes a bit. Hit up your friends that juice for a high quality steady supply of fresh organic veg and fruit trims and bits. Avoid acidic citrus, sulfuric onion, pastas (not a fruit or veg), but go wild with carrot peelings and tops, funky lettuce, melon rinds. Fridge clean outs are perfect for your worms!

The quality of what you feed your worms is the quality of your castings. Real nutrients, like the organic wastes of nature, give you excellent castings in return. Worms will eat non nutritious cardboard and lots of other things, but why? Better to recycle that in other ways.

The right kind of worms are RED WRIGGLERS! They forage on debris above ground. They are smaller than earthworms that live IN the earth. Fishermen use them for bait. Ask your fellow gardeners to give you a handful to get started, or go to the bait shack, or a local organic worm dealer. The little guys live about 2 years. My clew has been going strong for 12 years now.

Housing! Since they are surface foragers, these worms need width, not depth. Mine live in a low 4' by 2' opaque grey storage container. I put holes in the bottom for drainage, holes in the cover to let hot air out in summer. Inside the container I cover them with a large black plastic bag to keep it moist and dark for them. They feed all the way to the top because they feel safe no birds can see them!

Harvest the bumpy like little castings, look like fluffy coffee grounds, they push up to the surface. You have seen castings, often after a rain. Earth worms push them up into little textured piles on the soil's surface. I use an old coffee container with a handle. Take the 'blanket' off your worms. Give them about 5 minutes to dive out of the light. Gather the castings at the top. Wait a few more minutes for them to dive again, then gather some more.

Feeding your plants I walk about my garden to see who might need some castings, or where I plan to plant. Scratch out a shallow area. Most veggie annuals do all their root growing in the top 6 to 8 inches of soil. Spread some castings in, cover them with the soil you dug out. After you have used all the castings, water the areas lightly so the castings stay covered and moist. Remember, you don't need but 10-40% castings of the total volume of what you are growing your plants in.

How Castings Work! Castings are not exactly a fertilizer, ie their available N, Nitrogen, content is only 1.80 – 2.05 %, yet their NPK value is much higher than soil! NPK are the main minerals your plants need. The NPK in castings is locked in the cast, and slowly released as micro-organisms break it down. This is much better for plants, because it takes time for them to uptake nutrients. They can't do it all at once.

Vermicompost nutrients and minerals are significantly higher (with Nitrates up to 9 times higher) than garden soil. This creates electro-conductivity, in turn creating more salts in vermicompost. When there is too much salt in soil, it sucks water from plant roots resulting in the ‘burning’ of plants. Although there aren't enough salts in vermicompost to do that (it is much more common in chemical fertilizers), using too much wormcast can stunt plant growth. 

Optimum growth is in a soil ratio of 1:4, that's 25% castings, 75% soil. However it has been shown that even 10% of wormcast shows significant difference in plant growth. Using over 40% castings, plant growth performance is stunted and may even appear worse off than having no wormcast at all. A wise gardener knows more is not always better. And, your precious castings will go further.

An even more clever gardener will make a drain at one end of the box and collect the worm tea! Check out Bentley's post for some of the finer details to consider and how to process your leachate for maximum results. If you aren't doing worm tea, move your worm box from time to time so that juice can drip into your soil, making it rich and nutritious. Plants will grow like crazy there!

Plant recovery! L.A. Times, 5/27/00, Julie Bawden Davis: “Convinced that nothing could help a whitefly infested hibiscus in my garden that had been struggling for two years, I spread a one inch layer of worm castings around the plant. A month later I noticed that the whitefly population had dwindled. Three weeks later there were absolutely no whiteflies on the plant. It’s now back to its healthy self and producing lots of blooms.”

To my delight, visitors often wonder if I have named my worms! We all laugh and I show them more worms! Oh, and how do you get more worms?! Worms are hermaphrodites, meaning each worm has both male and female reproductive parts. The worm does have to mate in order to reproduce, but, every worm they meet is a potential mate. When a worm gets to be about six weeks old it forms a white band around its head, called a clitellum, this is where their reproductive organs are located. 

Under ideal circumstances, worm populations can double in a month. They begin breeding at 2 months old, are capable of producing 96 babies each month. Worms have a brain and five hearts. Worms breathe through their skin. They have neither eyes nor ears but are extremely aware of vibrations such as thumps or banging on the composter.  Please try not to disturb them unnecessarily. Worms are odorless and free from disease. 

Worm Economics and Education! Vermiculture has become common practice. Private Worm Farms abound! Universities and schools have educational programs, cities have programs, zoos, private organizations proudly tell their story. Websites assist you about raising your own or starting your own business.

Buying Castings! No time for one more thing to do?! Get your castings from a reputable organic seller. There are many great companies with high quality castings today. Don't confuse an amendment, with castings added, with a bag or bucket of pure castings. Remember, a little bit of the right stuff goes a long way. Give them to your indoor plants too.

Whether for prevention, nutrition, recovery or economics, worm castings are fabulous. Worms work for free, and are sustainable! 

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Seattle's Urban Food Forest Open For Foraging late Summer!

Seattle's Beacon Food Forest Design

So what is a food forest?! Simply, it is a perimeter, usually U shaped, of trees with veggies growing in the hot less windy protected center area. If done like nature, it is seamless, with low veggies, then shrubs, then understory trees, then the taller trees. You can't tell where one 'layer' begins or ends. In sustainable style, the trees are for wood or food, like nut trees, multi variety grafted dwarf fruit trees, native elderberry. The shrubs might be native hollyleaf cherries, blueberries or a thicket of black berries, roses for rose hips, currants, guavas, rosemary. Many times, people have been in flourishing native gardens and not even known it. 

Beacon Food Forest is using land donated by Seattle Public Utilities, and has a $100,000 grant from the city. Glenn Herlihy, one of the creators, says the forest could eventually produce "quite a bit of food," and he hopes it will be a place where the community can come together. The forest will include a teaching space, conventional community gardening plots, a barbecue spot, and recreational areas. 

Set to become the nation’s largest forageable space, it will cover seven acres within city limits, offering FREE FOOD, everything from plum, apple, and walnut trees, to berry bushes, herbs and vegetables. 

Herlihy hopes visitors will practice "ethical harvesting"--taking what they need, or what they can eat right away. But for those feeling greedy, there will be a "thieves garden" containing lower-grade stuff. "We also plan to have a lot of people around, so you’re not going to feel comfortable taking a lot of stuff," he adds.

The Video! Beacon Food Forest, in turn, has inspired London's Mabley Green, close by the Olympic Park, to create their own food forest of fruit and nut trees with vegetables, raspberries and herbs on the forest floor. The latest news I could find on that was dated Mar 10, 2014 - the project has been approved to the tune of £860,000, that's $1,445,942 US! They want it to be the world's largest “edible park!” Chairman of the user group, Damian Rafferty, says the edible garden would help tackle childhood obesity rates, of which Hackney has some of the worst in London. "We also want Hackney mums to be able to say to the children, ‘Run to the park and pick some apples for the tea.’ It’s about bringing a bit of rural into an urban area.”

The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now. - Chinese Proverb
 



Upcoming Garden Events!

Walk or bike to events as possible!

May is Public Gardens Appreciation Month in Santa Barbara

May is Public Gardens appreciation month in Santa Barbara CA!

UCCE Master Gardeners are offering 3 workshops and a Garden Tour!

Please join UC Cooperative Extension (UCCE) Master Gardeners of Santa Barbara County for these informative May workshops and our first Garden Tour of the Masters!

Saturday, May 3, 2014, 10:00 AM to 11:00AM: BUTTERFLIES in YOUR GARDEN By Master Gardeners Lynn Kirby and Helen Fowler.  You will learn about Monarch butterflies, their lifecycle, and how to attract butterflies to your garden.  Cost: Free Louise Lowry Davis Center

Saturday, May 17, 2014, 9:00AM–1:00PM or 12:00PM –4:00PM: GARDEN TOUR of the MASTERS This event will feature a tour of three very special private gardens of our Master Gardeners. Fundraising cost: $30/person. Advance purchase required. More information and purchase tickets online at: http://ucanr.edu/sbgardentourmay2014 Begins at the  Louise Lowry Davis Center.

Saturday, May 24, 2014, 10:00AM to 11:00AM: WATER in YOUR GARDEN–FRIEND or FOE By Master Gardener Gary Kravetz and Cathie Pare, Water Resources Specialist, City of Santa Barbara. You will learn useful tips on irrigation, monitoring plants and soil for water needs and optimal water management in your garden. Cost: Free  Louise Lowry Davis Center

Saturday, May 31, 2014, 10:00AM to 11:30AM: BEAUTIFUL GARDEN DESIGN for DROUGHT By Master Gardeners Lesley Wiscomb and Donna Simmons with Billy Goodnick, author and landscape architect.  You will learn about an array of drought tolerant plants and how to design a beautiful garden using Bill’s savvy design techniques and extensive knowledge.  Cost: Free  Louise Lowry Davis Center



image of National Public Gardens Day is Friday, May 9, 2014 logo

National Public Gardens Day at Santa Barbara Botanic Garden!
Friday, May 9, 2014, 9 AM - 6 PM 

Get outside and celebrate! Sponsored nationally by American Public Gardens Association (APGA), 

Admission to locations is available by downloading a coupon at: http://nationalpublicgardensday.org

Download the National Public Gardens Day COUPON for SBBG


Backyard Food Forests with Larry Saltzman (guest speaker to be confirmed)

A Guide to Creating small scale food forests using Permaculture Principles. Learn how to turn your lawns and ornamental gardens into a forest garden that is both beautiful and productive. 

The morning session takes place in Larry and Linda’s mature backyard food forest. In the afternoon we move to Mesa Harmony Garden, a three-year-old community food forest in the making. 

When: May 10th, 2014, 9:AM until 4:00 PM (Break for Lunch 11:30 – 12:30) 

Where: 9–11am:- El Prado Place, Samarkand, 12:30-4pm:- Mesa Harmony Garden, Dolores Drive, Mesa 

Contact: Larry Saltzman (805) 451-4168 or saltzmanforest@gmail.com 

Attendance limited to 30 people so please RSVP
Please make your own arrangements for transport and for lunch. (Ask if you’re interested in car-sharing). 

Suggested Donation: $25-$50 Students $10-$20 (Donations go to Mesa Harmony Garden, a 501(c)3 non-profit). 

Trades of volunteer labor at Mesa Harmony Garden are an option in lieu of cash donations.


Probiotic Pickles, Fairview Garden, Michelle Doran
Farm Classes

FERMENTING FUN
  - May 10, 9am-1pm
Learn to make Fermented Veggies-Pickles, Sauerkraut and Kimchi

PROBIOTIC DRINKS – May 15, 7-9pm
Home Grown Ginger Ale, Root Beer and Fruit Sodas

Your instructor is the wonderful Michelle Doran, wildlife biologist, southern California hike leader, specializes in native butterflies and demonstration gardens. She has ties to the native ancestors of this land, is the founder of the Ojai Food Co-op start-up.

Fairview Gardens, 598 N. Fairview Avenue, Goleta, CA




Leave a wild place, untouched, in your garden! It’s the place the faeries and elves, the little people can hang out. When you are down on your hands and knees, they will whisper what to do. All of a sudden an idea pops in your mind….

Cerena

In the garden of thy heart, plant naught but the rose of love. – Baha’U’Uah
"Earth turns to Gold in the hands of the Wise" Rumi

 
Summer! Peppers, edible flowers, tomatoes!

Cerena Childress, Plot 46
elist holder Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden

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