Cerena writes to help new gardeners get started,
remind experienced gardeners to plant at the best times, inspire us to try new techniques!  Being outdoors gardening is healthy
for our bodies and spirits, provides the most nutritious organic veggies right on your table with no food miles at all! 


Green Bean Connection

Happy Late Summer, First Fall Plantings!!

AUGUST - Beauty and Bounty!
Super Fall Veggies Varieties, Combination Plantings!
A Serious Word about BAGRADA BUGS
Hot Summer Weather Protection for Your Veggies!
Seattle's Urban Food Forest UPDATE!

Events! American Community Gardening Assn Conference, Natl Heirloom Expo, SOL Food Festival, Home & Garden Expo!


Dear Pilgrim Terrace Gardeners, Garden Friends,


A hearty WELCOME BACK to gardener Patty Showalter after a 3 year absence and some life changes! I'm delighted she's in Plot 29. A dancing Welcome Home to Hector and Anna, Plot 
17! They have cleared the plot and are ready to roll!

Condolences to our garden coordinator Pete Leyva on the loss of his Mother. 

A request to gardeners with Bermuda grass! Please. Clear it out, it goes into other gardeners' plots. Lots more work for many of us. Thanks!

Are you wondering where those mysterious double puncture marks on your tomatoes came from? Or have your beans been nibbled? RATS! We surprised one twice and saw it run under the shed. It surprised us too, so there were a couple screams!

If you or a friend would still enjoy :) gardening at a community garden, :), get going right now - fall planting time from seeds started at the end of July! Early to mid August from seeds, Labor Day and September are perfect for transplants! 'Buy one plot, get another one 1/2 price!' YES! Go directly to the Louise Lowry Davis Center, Parks & Recreation office, to sign up. That's at 1232 De La Vina St, Santa Barbara. We'll be delighted to be in your good company!
 


August! Beauty and Bounty! 


Love your Mother! Plant more bee food! Eat less meat. Grow organic!

Some of you gardeners may be a wee bit tired of picking prodigious batches of green beans, but keep up with harvesting, it keeps your plants producing! I hope you have been canning, freezing, fermenting, storing, drying!  

There are HOT August days, and ones that have a hint of fall. Days are a tad shorter; shadows in different places now. It is the time of the turn of the seasons here in coastal SoCal! Though crazy busy with harvests, gardeners are making their first fall plantings mid August, especially from seed! Often they are made in semi shaded 'nursery' areas to be transplanted as they get bigger and space becomes available. Plant your seeds far enough apart to get your trowel in to pick your little plants up to move them one by one to their new home. Some are planted under finishing plants to take the finishing plant's place, like peas under beans. Pop in some kale between the tomatoes and peppers. Safe in a greenhouse is wonderful too!

Already, get your seed packs for celery, chard, mustard greens, parsley, peas, winter radish varieties, and Brassicas: cabbage, brocs, Brussels sprouts, collards, cauliflower, kale babies, kohlrabi, turnips. See below for help on choosing the very best varieties! Winter plants that get a good start while there is still some heat, will be producing a lot sooner than plants started while it is cooler, and you will have a much earlier crop. 

Make your own Seed Strips! They are great for radish, carrots, any seeds that are small and hard to handle. It's an easy, satisfying evening activity that saves your back, and seeds, when you are planting!

If seeds don't work for you, don't have time to do the extra watering, you will be away at the critical time, keep harvesting, do your soil preps, and wait for September or October transplanting. Labor Day weekend is the big planting time for many gardeners, and that's only a month away now!

Summer plants you can still plant for early fall harvests, are beans and early maturing tomatoes and corn. Corn is more disease prone at this time though.

Tuck in your year-round fillers, beets, bunch onions, carrots, summer lettuces, radish, to keep a colorful variety for your table. 

Plant sweet potato slips in late summer for harvest around Christmas.  Jenny Knowles, then at Plot 16, harvested these tasty beauties Dec 28, 2011!  She let sprouted taters grow into plants while on her kitchen window sill. She planted them in August/Sep, on the sunny side of her black composter. Clearly, between the super compost nutrition, and the heat of the composter, both from the black color and the warmth of the decomposing compost, she succeeded! She got several smaller pups before she took the main plant and the large central potatoes. I was lucky to witness this fine harvest!

ONIONS  For the biggest, sweetest harvests, late summer and early fall are the prime times to sow seeds of short- or intermediate-day onions. Fall-sown short- and intermediate-day onions tend to yield more and are larger and sweeter than those seeded or transplanted in early spring.  Onions have stupendous flavor and come in white, yellow, red! 

Give your heavy producers a good feed.  Eggplants have a large fruit, beans put out a ton of beans, tomatoes are big and working hard, peppers can be profuse!  They like a tad of chicken manures scratched in, bunny poop and straw (pick up at Animal Shelters), well aged horse manure and compost makes them dance with the faeries in the night time!  Fertilizers highest in P, Phosphorus, keeps blooming and fruiting at an optimum. 

Keep your watering steady to avoid slowing or stopping production or misshapen fruits - that's curled beans, odd shaped peppers, catfaced strawberries. In hot late summer weather water short rooted high production plants like beans, cucumbers, lettuces and strawberries more frequently.  Keep them well mulched, especially the cucumbers.  Keep them off the ground to protect them from suffering from the wilts fungi. I put down straw a good 3" deep.      

In our hot foothills and further south, watch your melons and pumpkins for their best harvest time - when they 'slip' off the vine.  Hold off irrigating melons about a week before they will ripen so their sugars will concentrate. Harvest okra while it is small and tender - bigger is NOT better!  Let your winter squash harden.

Design Your Fall Garden! Move plants from the nursery area as space becomes available, but have a plan too. Tall plants, trellises, to the North or on the shady side, then plants of graduated sizes to the South or sunniest areas. Peas need a string or wire trellis for their tiny tendrils. They aren't like beans that twine anything. Few winter plants need support, but big brocs, tall kales sometimes need staking. If they 'lay down,' if you have the room and want more plants, they will grow baby plants along their stems! Otherwise, put your plants back up and stake them securely. Build your new raised beds. Install gopher barriers!

Think soil, soil, soil! When an area is done, clear away insect hiding places. Remove and throw away any mulches from under where diseased plants were.  If your soil is high for the area, plants there were diseased, and you have a plentiful compost stash, maybe remove the couple top inches of soil and generously lay on some of that tasty new compost!  Dig it into the top 4 to 6 inches. Amend your soils per the plant that will be grown in the area per your design.  

Keep turning your fall compost pile, start one if you haven't! This warmer weather will help the pile decompose faster, and your plants will be blessed when you give the compost to them! If you aren't hot composting, remember, thin layers and smaller bits decompose faster. The ratio is 1 wet/green to 2 dry/brown. Throw in whatever kitchen trim, torn tea bags, coffee filters/grounds, crushed eggshells - anything worms can eat will decompose faster. I'm talking faster because starting now is a little late, so this is what you do to 'catch up!' Sprinkle with a handful or two of living moist soil to inoculate your pile, and some red wriggler worms here and there to make your pile jump up! Turn it as often as you can to aerate and keep things humming. Once a day if possible, but do what you can. I do mine about every two weeks. Compost improves your soil's water holding capacity and adds and stabilizes N, Nitrogen!  Yes!

SeedSaving! Allow your healthiest top producers to seed. Seeds are your second harvest! Each year keep your best! Scatter some about if they would grow successfully now! Store your keepers in a cool dry place for next year's plantings.  Remember, these seeds are adapted to you and your locality. If you are willing, take your extras to a local Seed Bank!  While you are there, pick up some of your fall favorites and some new ones to try out!

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A Serious Word about BAGRADA BUGS



California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas gardeners alert!

Brassicas are their favorite, and Brassicas are THE SoCal winter garden plant! I've seen them here and there lately, but this morning found infested mulch! YUK and bummer!
  • What some of the local organic farmers are doing is planting mustards as a trap plant. Giant red mustards give them plenty to munch on. If you find mustard transplants at your nursery, buy them without delay! The Bagradas prefer them, so they go there rather than your brocs. 
  • Mind you, you still have to remove the Bagadas by whatever means you prefer, or the brocs are next. Bagradas are fast reproducers, make virtual swarms, and when they suck juices from your plant toxic disease producing stuff gets in your plant. In hot temps, I've seen a 1 1/2 foot tall plant go down in 3 days. 
  • I highly suggest biodiversity, interplanting - that's mixing it up, even interplanting different varieties of the same plant (especially broccolis), rather than monoculturing - a row of a single kind of plant. With rows of a single plant, the pest or disease simply goes plant to plant and you lose the whole row. This also stops leafminers (typical on soft leaved chard & beets) from going plant to plant. Slows them way down. 
  • Plant so mature plant leaves don't touch! Stop the ease of transmission. If you can't help yourself, and go monoculture, plant too close, clip back the between leaves so they don't touch.
  • Remove infested or diseased leaves immediately. Hold a bucket underneath the area you are going to clip. Bagradas drop to the ground the moment you disturb the plant. The bucket catches them and the leaves. DO NOT lay the leaves or trim on the ground. Eggs you might not see hatch quickly, defeating your clipping. Tie them in a plastic bag, and take them to the TRASH, not in compost or green waste. Simply moving Bagradas doesn't work. They fly.
  • Don't lay down mulch, instead, remove any mulch you see them in, and from around infested or susceptible plants until the Bagrada season is OVER. They hide out in the mulch, mate like crazy, then climb back up on the plant when you are gone. I've seen it. Stand very still and wait...sure enough, there they come. That's your second chance to remove, euphemism for kill, some more. 
  • Use mycorrhizae fungi when you plant. The fungi network linking your plants is proven that when one plant gets a disease or pest, it warns the neighbor plant. That plant then boosts its own defenses!
Here is the link to some additional really excellent information at UC IPM (Integrated Pest Management) published Jan 2014.

Good luck, Dear Gardeners. Let us know your stories.
 


Super Fall Veggies Varieties, Combination Plantings!  



Some start fall plantings from seed the last week of July. Now to mid August is great time too! Varieties make all the difference! Planting from seed gives you so many more choices!

Beets are so beautiful! Tops and roots are both nutritious! In salad as chopped greens, shredded roots. Root soup! Steamed slices. Cold with a dash of Balsamic! There are numerous colors, a combo seed pack may be perfect for you. Plant them on the sunny side, just barely under, larger plants like broccoli or kale, at the base of peas. Plant a beet patch alternated with pretty little red bunch onions! 

Brassicas, Bagradas, Mustard Greens! I have been seeing Bagrada bugs this July, so I highly recommend you plant some trap plants like Giant Mustard Greens. Bagradas go for them first, among your Brassicas! Brassicas are our broccoli, kale, cabbage, collards, Brussels sprouts. 

  • Broccoli! My personal favorite variety is All Season F1 even though it doesn't come in purple! It is a short variety about a foot and a half tall, produces a big main head followed by large 3" diameter side heads! It continues to grow side branches, so the plant needs room to expand. The most radically different than that variety I ever grew was 5' tall with trillions of little 1" side shoots that I got really tired cutting. These days I cut down the stem several leaves deep, to the second to lowest producing junction, which slows things down so I have time to eat what I got before the next harvest.

    Research has shown there are less aphids when you plant different varieties of brocs together! Buy mixed 6 packs of brocs when they are available if you like the varieties in it, or plant a mix of seeds of varieties you like. UC study explains 

    If you like the scent, winter, early spring are good times for cilantro. It doesn't bolt so fast. Summer it bolts, winters It will freeze, so replants go with the territory. It makes brocs grow REALLY well, bigger, fuller, greener!

    Broccoli vitamins and nutrients typically are more concentrated in the flower buds than in leaves. That makes broccoli and cauliflower better sources of vitamins and nutrients than Cole crops in which only the leaves are eaten, like kale, collards or Brussels sprouts. The anti-cancer properties of these vegetables are so well established that the American Cancer Society recommends that Americans increase their intake of broccoli and other Cole cropsBroc is high in bio available Calcium too. 
      
  • Brussels Sprouts are iffy in our 1 mile-from-the-coast climate. They like colder. If you don't mind small fruits, go for it. They certainly are tasty, like mini cabbages! Buy local varieties recommended by your neighbors or nursery. 
     
  • Cabbages grow huge, an easy 2' footprint, but slowly. Plant carrot-like white icicle winter varieties of radish between them. They will do the same job as the giant mustard greens, same family. It is said lettuces repel cabbage moths. Put a few of them between the cabbages and radishes. Plant lettuces from transplants because dying parts of Brassicas put out a poison that prevents some seeds, like tiny lettuce seeds, from growing.

    Plant any variety cabbage you like, though red and savoy types, resist frost better! Check out the time to maturity if you want a sooner harvest, and harvest the first ones when they are smaller. Red cabbage shreds are pretty in winter salads. If you are making probiotic sauerkraut, let the heads get very firm so your sauerkraut is good and crunchy!
     
  • Cauliflower comes in traditional white, also yellow, green and purple! It comes in the traditional head shapes, and also the castle green spiral variant, Romanesco! It's a visual choice! The colors do have varying antioxidant qualities if that is a factor for you.
     
  • Kale, the Queen of Nutrition! Kale's attractive greenery packs over ten times the vitamin A as the same amount of iceberg lettuce, has more vitamin C per weight than orange juice! kale’s calcium content is in the most bioavailable form – we absorb almost twice as much calcium from kale than we do from milk! Also, kale is one of the foods that lowers blood pressure naturally.

    There are several varieties! Dense curly leaf, a looser curly leaf, Lacinato – Elephant/Dinosaur long curved bumpy leaf, Red Russian flat leaf, Red Bor a medium curly leaf, and Red Chidori, an edible ornamental kale! Lots of amazing choices! Plants with more blue green leaves are more cold hardy and drought tolerant!

    Aphids and white fly love Kale, so you might want to choose varieties without those dense convolutions the insects can't be gotten out of. But for the footprint per return, curly leaf kale can't be beat. Keep watch. Spray those little devils away. Take a look at this Mother Earth page for some good practical thinking and doing!

Chard has two main varieties, regular colorful size, and huge super prolific white Fordhook Giant size! Colorful chard is better than flowers ~ it especially brightens the winter garden! It has super nutrition, is low calorie. It produces like crazy, the most if it has loose, well-drained, sandy loam soils rich in organic matter. If you need nutrition per square foot, the Giant is the way to go! Fordhooks are a phenomena! 

Peas and Carrots, no onions, onion family, within several feet. Onions stunt peas. Carrots grow down, peas grow up, perfect! The frilly carrot foliage is lovely living mulch. Be sure your soil is soft for carrot growth, but not manured. Peas make their own Nitrogen, and carrots get hairy if overfed. Peas need water, but over watering causes carrots to split. 

Peas come in two size varieties, bush and pole. Bush varieties produce sooner, pole produces continuously. A lot of gardeners plant both for a longer pea-loving harvest! :)

Peas come in three main kinds! 
  • SNAP! Those are eat off the plant, pod and all, tummy beans! Many never make it into the house! You can cook them, but why?! They are a quintessential snack, put in a fresh salad at most!
  • English are the originals, but are grown for the pea, not the whole pod! These are also called shelling peas since the peas need to be removed from the pod. These can come in splendid varieties 8" long, full of tasty peas!
  • Chinese peas are the flat ones you get with those Oriental dishes, although many of them never get to the kitchen either!
The last thing to know about peas is they can be Stringless! Look for that on the seed package or transplant tag. Strings can be tough, get tangled in your teeth, take time to remove before using. It's a simple thing, but makes a difference to your enjoyment.

You can go crazy picking veggie varieties! Fun happy crazy! If you can't make up your mind, if one is an All America Selection, AAS, go for it! They are generally superb. You may have a dilemma whether to go with heirlooms only or some hybrids too. Nature hybridizes plants all the time, so I feel good with them. GMOs are another story. Personally I am not in favor of them. Safe Seeds sellers list by state and country. Companies known to use GMO sources. Some may surprise you.
 
Get used to thinking in combinations! Happy plant communities help each other thrive! And speaking of communities, Brassicas don't partner up with community forming mycorrhizal fungi. Other winter veggies do, so if you are buying compost, get the ones with the most mycorrhizal fungi, and sprinkle the roots of non-Brassica transplants with mycorrhizal fungi when you are planting! 

May you and your garden enjoy each other's company!

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Hot Summer Weather Protection for Your Veggies


Heather Yarrow at 2006 4Head Garden of Dreams co-designer, watering topiary sculpture designed by Sue and Peter Hill. Royal Horticultural Society, 84th Chelsea Flower Show, London

Heat lovers will flourish, you may feel like lazing about, but at times, some plants need your help! It's a fine art!

Keep an eye on weather reports.

Water is key.
  • Water in advance when hot weather is predicted.
  • Water early in the day as possible so your plants have as much moisture as possible during the hottest time. On the hottest days, a second watering may be needed.
  • Don't be confused by wilting. Some plants, like chard, shut down to conserve water when it is hot. In the AM they perk right back up by the next morning!
  • Water deep and occasionally. Frequent light watering encourages lush growth but also promotes shallower roots so that the plant is less prepared to cope when there is a reduction or no water coming on a hot day.
  • Remove water competitor weeds.
  • Harvest frequently and thoroughly; make it easier for your plants to keep up with the business of staying alive. Ripening fruits demand huge loads of water and nutrients. 
  • Hydrozone - Plant water lovers, shallow rooted planties, together when compatible.
  • Strawberry tip: On a raised mound, lay down an untreated pallet, or 3 to 4 inch wide boards side by side separated about 3 to 4 inches apart. Fill the pallet with soil, plant your berries. As the berry leaves grow, they cover the boards, keeping them cool, the boards in turn keep the soil below cool and moist and the boards feed the soil as they decompose.
Water if there has been a drying wind. Windy conditions can interfere with fruit set too, so if you can, create windbreaks. Use non heat radiating materials that allow some airflow so they won't be blown over if you are in a wind pattern area. No air flow can make your garden a heat trap. In future, at planting times, anticipate winds, install trellises, planting them thinnly to allow air flow. In SoCal 'winters,' they can block cold winds. In spring, put in some corn for filtered shade and as a windbreak. You may have to stake taller large bodied varieties of corn. Might choose varieties with less height that mature sooner, require less nutrients, and create less waste.

Keep your Mulch topped! Cover bare spots and replenish where your mulch is getting thin. 4 Inches is a good depth. Preferably use light colored mulches, like straw, that reflect the sunlight. If your mulch has meshed into a tight layer, use a watering spike so water gets to the roots of your plants. Straw, rather than a meshing mulch, is better for your veggies. But if you have Bagrada Bugs, REMOVE your mulch ASAP!

Container gardeners consider these terra cotta plant spike/bottle setups. Steady moisture right at the root zones! The adapter fits wine or plastic bottles! There are other variations. You can cut the bottom off a plastic bottle, for easy refilling! Cover with cloth and a rubber band to keep debris or insects from clogging your spike. One of the advantages of container gardening is plants can be moved into temporary shade if available if necessary.

Terra cotta water spikes, steady water at the root zone for container plants!

Incorporate water holding compost into your soil, but also know that your soil only needs 5% humus, and over composting is not helpful.

WikiHow says: 'In times of heat shock, a seaweed extract based liquid fertilizer treatment often reduces heat stress and it may help protect the plant in future.' If your plant needs a feed, mix that kelp with some fish emulsion.

Shade Cloth over Remesh to protect veggies from summer heat!If you have tender plants, maybe seedlings, set up some temporary shade. Safely prop up some nursery plants flats with the fine mesh, or use some scrap lattice. For an easy custom fit, a simple set up is remesh, bent to the shape you want, anchored, covered with shade cloth. The beauty of shade cloth is it comes in ‘shade factors,’ the degree of blocked sunlight, and can range from 25% – 90% ! Salad greens do well with 50 – 60% shade factor. Heat lovers like squash and beans do well under 30% shade cloth. Or, simply pop in a well anchored umbrella. Power up some shade sails, an old sheet or dust cloths. Just be sure there is air flow - no baking your plants! When the heat is over, remove your covers promptly so your plants won't get used to having them and suffer at the time of their removal. 

If you live in a hot area, consider permanent options like this beautiful sliding wire canopy at Desert Botanical Garden! This image is used by permission from Rock Rose Blog! Thanks, Jennifer, it's lovely!




Design well ahead of time for 'shelter' plantings! In late summer, early fall, winter transplants, having shallow roots, will do well in partial shade of mature plants that will soon be pulled. This way, the sun will be available to the little ones when they are better established. In spring, plant corn or leeks, tall onions, north to south, that later allow filtered light to plants that need a little shade later on. Corn planted June/July can shade peppers or strawberries at the hottest August/September weather. 

Too much heat, water stress

  • Know that veggies have their own priorities. Some 'bolt,' go into flowering mode, at significant weather changes. They think the season has ended.
     
  • Some plants like tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, stop flowering and fruiting when temps rise above 85 to 90 degrees F (depending on humidity) for an extended time. Humidity causes pollen to stick and not fall to pollinate. Dry heat causes the pollen to fall and not stick! At those extremes, no amount of sharply rapping your plant or its cage will help pollination.
     
  • There are heat tolerant varieties, for example  Heatmaster and Solar Fire tomatoes are two. Heirlooms are more fussy, hybrids less. Cherry tomatoes and the Oregon State U-bred parthenocarpic tomatoes, including Gold Nugget, Oregon Spring, Oregon Star, Siletz and Legend, are the exception, as they will set fruit over a wider temperature range than most large-fruited types. Parthenocarpic and cherry tomatoes will fruit throughout the heat of summer, even in Tucson, according to the University of Arizona.
     
  • At 95 degrees, beans and peas simply drop their flowers. At 100 degrees, corn tassels are killed, no pollination can happen and its all over for them.

When it cools down, your other plants will get back into production. Wait for it.

Here in SoCal we are facing more heat, less rainfall. Being mindful of how and when you use our water is important. Selecting heat tolerant varieties makes good sense. With long-term climate changes, we gardeners will become more skilled at hot weather gardening!

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Seattle's Urban Food Forest UPDATE!

Seattle Urban Food Forest June 2014!

America’s first public food forest is about four miles from the Space Needle! Neighborhood residents and businesses, city agencies, and a veritable militia of volunteers have done it! The garden is flourishing, from mulberry trees to culinary mushrooms, veggies to paw paws! Monthly work parties typically attract over 100 volunteers! See more about it! If you are going to Seattle, stop by and lend a hand! <3
 
So what is a food forest?! Simply, it is a perimeter, usually U shaped, open to the southern sun, of trees with veggies growing in the hot less windy protected center area. If done like nature, it is seamless, with low veggies, then shrubs, then understory trees, then the taller trees. You can't tell where one 'layer' begins or ends. In sustainable style, the trees are for wood or food, like nut trees, multi variety grafted dwarf fruit trees, native elderberry. The shrubs might be native hollyleaf cherries, blueberries or a thicket of black berries, roses for rose hips, currants, guavas, rosemary. Many times, people have been in flourishing native gardens and not even known it. 

Beacon Food Forest is using land donated by Seattle Public Utilities, and has a $100,000 grant from the city. Glenn Herlihy, one of the creators, says the forest could eventually produce "quite a bit of food," and he hopes it will be a place where the community can come together. The forest will include a teaching space, conventional community gardening plots, a barbecue spot, and recreational areas. 

Set to become the nation’s largest forageable space, it will cover seven acres within city limits, offering FREE FOOD, everything from plum, apple, and walnut trees, to berry bushes, herbs and vegetables. 

Herlihy hopes visitors will practice "ethical harvesting"--taking what they need, or what they can eat right away. But for those feeling greedy, there will be a "thieves garden" containing lower-grade stuff. "We also plan to have a lot of people around, so you’re not going to feel comfortable taking a lot of stuff," he adds.

The Video! Beacon Food Forest, in turn, has inspired London's Mabley Green, close by the Olympic Park, to create their own food forest of fruit and nut trees with vegetables, raspberries and herbs on the forest floor. The latest news I could find on that was dated Mar 10, 2014 - the project has been approved to the tune of £860,000, that's $1,445,942 US! They want it to be the world's largest “edible park!” Chairman of the user group, Damian Rafferty, says the edible garden would help tackle childhood obesity rates, of which Hackney has some of the worst in London. "We also want Hackney mums to be able to say to the children, ‘Run to the park and pick some apples for the tea.’ It’s about bringing a bit of rural into an urban area.”

The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now. - Chinese Proverb
 



Upcoming Garden Events!

Walk or bike to events as possible!

American Community Gardening Association Conference
August 7 to 10, The Field Museum

American Community Garden Assn Conference Chicago 2014 

If you haven't already joined ACGA, do it today and be part of the community garden movement! Join

Compostable Waste Support: Zero waste goal for this event. 

 

Plan for this fabulous event September 9, 10, 11, 2014 at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds in Santa Rosa, California! Please tell your dearest family and friends about it. ONLY $25.00 – all 3 days!!!

National Heirloom Exposition Veggie Pyramid!

The National Heirloom Exposition is a not-for-profit event centered around the pure food movement, heirloom vegetables, and anti-GMO activism. Our second annual event held mid-September 2012 in Santa Rosa, California drew more than 18,000 people from around the country and beyond, 100 speakers, 300 venders! Some of the 2014 speakers: Dr Jon Mercola, John Jeavons, Vani Hari of FoodBabe.com, herbalist Shoshanna Easling - Making Babies, Robert Kourik, author of 14 books on sustainable gardening!
 



Save the Date!

5th Annual SOL Food Festival

Sat. September 27th, 2014 10am to 6pm


Plaza de Vera Cruz across from the Santa Barbara Farmers Market! (100 Block of East Cota St.)

EXHIBITOR APPLICATIONS   Volunteer!   Sponsorship Opportunities

Partnered with the FoodBank, the SOL Food Festival is a one-day community festival that celebrates local farmers, chefs, organizations and individuals who are working toward a healthy food system for all. It is a place to connect, learn, create, network, inspire, and play our way to a brighter food future. Enjoy talks by local experts. Walk the booths. Bring your family! Eat scrumptious healthy food! 

Everyone has the power to create a more healthful, sustainable and delicious food future for themselves and their community.
 
The same day as Sol Food, and Sunday, please also enjoy the


at Earl Warren Showgrounds!
Sat. and Sun. Sept. 27th & 28th
10 am to 5 pm Saturday and 10 am to 4 pm Sunday

Master Gardeners will be helping staff the Santa Barbara Horticulture Society table! Take images or samples so they can better answer your questions! Have a great time!

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Leave a wild place, untouched, in your garden! It’s the place the faeries and elves, the little people can hang out. When you are down on your hands and knees, they will whisper what to do. All of a sudden an idea pops in your mind….

Cerena

In the garden of thy heart, plant naught but the rose of love. – Baha’U’Uah
"Earth turns to Gold in the hands of the Wise" Rumi

 
Summer! Peppers, edible flowers, tomatoes!

Cerena Childress, Plot 46
elist holder Pilgrim Terrace Community Garden

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