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July 2020 BPWNC Newsletter

 


"Different Struggles, Same Fight"
Wednesday, July 15
6 p.m.
Use Zoom link below
 

Join us to hear BPWNC member Tracy Pepper talking about her newly formed organization, Color Me Human. Her talk and Powerpoint are entitled "Different Struggles, Same Fight." See Tracy's article below for more perspective on this issue, and feel free to forward this email to invite friends to join us at this meeting.
 




Use this link to join the meeting from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: 
 
Or Telephone:  +1 669 900 6833 (US Toll)
    Meeting ID: 973 4172 0141
 
If you need help with Zoom, call Susan Rogers, (530) 271-1311
 
Mark your calendar and keep this email for the Zoom link. 

Color Me Human
 
Color me Human, is for everyone who cares about the wellbeing of all families, friends, and members of our community. Tracy Pepper, a past member of the BPW scholarship committee, is the Founder and Executive Director of Color Me Human. Focused on bringing awareness and unity to our small town and beyond, Color Me Human has gained support and leadership from our county's youth, as well as people of all backgrounds and heritage, who care about uniting our community in love, respect, and safety for all.

Color Me Human aims to create a richer understanding of biases that many people
face here in Nevada County. The recent global focus on issues of prejudices, racism, and systemic oppression following the murders of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and many more before them, shine a light on how much work there is yet to do to dismantle racism.

The underrepresented members of our community have shouldered this task, silently enduring biases, or when we do speak out, we are often shut down, advised to "just get over it," or told, "it's just your imagination." Many seem surprised at the vitriolic, racist, and hateful comments of those in this community - our friends, our coworkers, our neighbors. One need only look at recent events in America and on social media to see the magnitude and depth of racism and how it permeates society at every level.

Amongst us, some want to work for change but do not know how or where to get involved and want to learn about and explore their own biases. Color Me Human convenes safer spaces for, and facilitates, difficult conversations and offers a series of racial literacy workshops that explore systemic oppression, racism, and implicit and explicit biases. Beginning this Fall, we will offer a series of workshops, including Building Racial Literacy 101, tailored for individuals, community organizations, corporations, and government agencies.

We believe It imperative people to begin to explore their biases and learn of the systemic oppression of Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), immigrants, LBGTQ+ folks, and other underrepresented community members. Through inclusive and accessible workshops and conversations, Color Me Human aspires to overcome this ignorance and step toward a future that allows for discussion and understanding about differences and how we can come together to create a genuinely safe and inclusive space for everyone.

For more information, visit www.colormehuman.org


by Tracy Pepper

Dear BPWNC Members,
I am reaching out to you this month not only to say hello but to acknowledge that we are in the midst of the most challenging times in recent memory. I hope all of you are doing well and staying safe and healthy, taking precautions to follow all the guidelines we’ve been given. For all of us, it is a hardship to be unable to meet for our monthly programs and to share dinner and friendship with one another.

It is tempting, too, to refrain from renewing memberships when we are not meeting. I want to ask that you please keep your membership current because it will take each of us to continue keeping our BPWNC strong and active. We are experiencing a pause in our face-to-face meetings, but we are still the same organization that is a strong and vital member of our Sierra Foothills community. So please remember to renew your membership as it comes due and contact one another when you can. I hope it won’t be long before we can resume our monthly meetings and greet each other in person.

Until then, stay well and explore new ways to enjoy this unique time in our lives.

Moving Forward,
Mary Sivila, President


 

ITS TIME TO RENEW YOUR BPWNC MEMBERSHIP
 
It takes each of us to continue keeping BPWNC strong and active so please renew your annual dues which are $25.00
 
Renew online now by clicking HERE
or 
send a check to:
BPWNC Treasurer
PO Box 291
Grass Valley  Ca  95945
SPOTLIGHT on our member Judy McCarrick

 
Tell us about yourself.
Bottom line, I’m an idealist and only a bit more cynical now than I was as a child.
I sincerely believe we all have a responsibility to make the world better educated, kinder, happier, healthier, freer and more equal. Oddly, I grew up in a very white, middle-class family of good, hard-working parents who loved me dearly but who rarely questioned the status quo. When I was eight I began to ask why a lot – why were some people poor and others rich? Why were people mean to other people they didn’t even know? Why were there forbidden subjects that kids couldn’t know about? That’s when the seeds of my political activism began. I went to UC Davis when I was 17, married a Veterinary student at 19, and finished my degree at 20. From there it’s a long story, but one of the best parts is that I have five bright, kind and challenging children, nine super-achiever, world-changing grandchildren, and one smart, loveable great-grandchild.

What did you want to be as a child?
An actress. I memorized scripts and coerced my poor, patient parents into being my audience while I acted out every part. I studied the Stanislavski method of acting and went around pretending I was a chair or a cat. I joined a little theater group in high school and had a wonderful time taking part in plays locally. I also liked to draw and read. My parents usually took me everywhere with them, but with the proviso that I had to occupy myself and not bother the adults. I had a little backpack where I always carried my books and a sketch pad and pencils.
 
Where have you lived and why?
I’m a California native, born and raised in the Bay Area, followed by five years at UC Davis, and then starting in 1962, I lived for twenty-one years in San Diego with two interruptions. I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in the 1970s and took my family to Colombia where we lived (very happily) for two and a half years. After we returned during three summers, we lived in Cambria. I went to grad school and began teaching at San Diego State University. In 1983 we moved to Santa Cruz where I was an administrator at UCSC until 2000. I retired and moved to Nevada City twenty years ago this July..
 
What influenced you to live in Nevada County?
I’d never been to Nevada County until my son, Dan, daughter-in-law, Jayne, and their three children moved to Grass Valley. They convinced me to look at this area when I retired. And here I am. What I didn’t realize is that my dad, my grandfather, and my three uncles built the Girl Scout Camp, which is now Camp Del Oro, here in the 1930s. I think they also built the dam at Lake Wildwood and some of the older homes in this area but, unfortunately, I don’t have a list of them.

What do you consider to be your greatest accomplishment?
That’s a tough question. I don’t think I have a single “greatest” accomplishment, but like most of us, I do have several achievements that I’m proud of. First, rearing five children as a single parent while working full-time at San Diego State University and getting my teaching credential and MA – those were a series of achievements that, believe it or not, they were exciting and fun. I loved that period of my life. I loved our noisy household. Working as a guide at Hearst San Simeon State Historical Monument, giving bi-lingual tours, living in Cambria during the summers with my family was another achievement that I really enjoyed. Teaching at San Diego State University, writing curricula, working with international students – all wonderful, horizon-expanding experiences. My Peace Corps experience was the turning point and led me to the career I pursued afterwards, but living in a non-English-speaking country as a working class member of the culture was the biggest eye-opener of my life. Returning to the U.S. was difficult and it took a full year to re-assimilate into my own culture. I couldn’t believe how much we consume and waste. Most of us take our comforts for granted – I certainly did- until I saw the contrast between my country and Colombia, between a strong, middle-class here and a huge, poverty-ridden population with an obscenely wealthy, protected upper-class there. That’s why I’m so adamant about the political changes I think are important now. I don’t want to see our middle-class, our working-class weakened.

Another achievement is my role as Assistant Dean at UC Santa Cruz and the programs my department created and initiated, particularly the Seaside Math/Science Institute, a residential program we created in the 1990s for minority middle-school students who came to UCSC for month-long intensive studies in mathematics and science. We hosted guest speakers, including one of America’s first Black astronauts who came in his space suit and blew all of our minds! This Institute was what I’m most proud of in my nearly twenty years at UCSC because it turned some children’s lives around. We only accepted students with B, C, and D grade averages because we felt they needed to see opportunities ahead, and we were right! We tracked our students for several years and a high percentage went on to college! Two UC Berkeley professors have used our program as a model for a nation-wide residential program that currently exists on several campuses.  

Who is your celebrity crush?
Ha! Ha! I don’t have any celebrity crushes…they all put their shoes on one foot at a time like the rest of us…but I do admire some well-known people who move through the world with grace and intelligence and integrity. Rev. William J. Barber II, Congressman John Lewis, Jane Goodall, Michelle Obama, and my newest hero, Prime Minister Jacinda Arden. And of course, many others.
 
What is your favorite word?
Resist!

How did you get involved in BPW?
My friend and former boss, Jan Corriden, invited me to join the Santa Cruz Chapter in 1983, God bless her!
 
Who would you invite to your dinner table- pick four guests- of any time period (living or not) for a lively conversation, with you as host.
It’s almost impossible to narrow it down to four. Nelson Mandela, Judi Dench, Barack Obama, Bisa Butler would be among my first choices. But I’d like to add a couple of leaves to my dinner table and include two Latino authors, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Isabel Allende. Opposite them I’d seat Andrea Bocelli and Robin Williams. If this dinner party is going to be really lively and fun, it has to take place outside, in Italy, on a summer evening, under the trees with a good pasta and salad, fresh bread and a robust wine. Michelangelo should sit next to Judy Chicago (to compare their artistic visions and styles), and at the far end of the table I’d like Golda Meir with Greta Thunberg seated on one side and Malala Yousafzai on the other. Those two brilliant young women would both appreciate the Prime Minister as a wise mentor. That should make for an interesting evening!
 
Which three books would you recommend we read?
The last three I read and really loved –
Next Year in Havana by Chanel Cleeton
The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert
The Library Book by Susan Orlean

What advice do you have for young women today?
Be authentic, be fierce, be proud, be undaunted, be kind, be self-aware and self-protective. Get all the education you can, wherever you can. Live outside your culture for at least two years. Keep a diary or record stories from your life for your descendants. Work very hard, love harder, and call your mama.
 
 
Club Business
 
Now that we have more home time help get the word out. Please send names and email addresses of your friends and family to Phyllis porzalli@att.net. to receive the BPWNC monthly newsletter. This will give them a great idea of our organization that you are involved with.
Thank  you
~ Membership, Deb Armanino 415-786-1160
 
*** Please add Phyllis Orzalli e-mail (porzalli@att.net) to your address book to ensure it does not go to junk!
Mission Statement
The mission of the Business and Professional Women of Nevada County
is to support and promote equity for women in all aspects of their lives.
 
Objectives
~To promote personal and professional development for working women.
~To advocate on National, State, and Local legislative issues of importance
to working women.
~To support the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls.
~To promote the education of our members and the community in matters of women's equality as it relates to economics, employment, health, education, housing, civil rights, and other issues of equal opportunity.
Interested in joining our dynamic group of women?
Want to take on a lead role in our organization?


We need active members who have time and interest
in being a board member: president, vice president, secretary,
treasurer or program committee.

For only a few hours a month you can guide future endeavors of our great group. Please contact Mary Sivila at 530-346-7192 or email her at 
marysivila@yahoo.com to discuss the great possibilities!
 
 
Follow-up From June's Spotlight
Grass Valley's Entrepreneur, Emily
 
Owner of Emilys Catering and Cakes
421 Colfax Hwy.
530  271 2253
 
Throughout the summer, Emily's catering is offering delicious entrees and of course treats on Thursdays and Fridays each week.  Check out the menu on Tuesdays online and order on Wednesday by phone. Payment is due when you order. Curbside pick up is either Thursday or Friday, your choice. Take it from me we have enjoyed every meal we have ordered!!!
SAVE THE DATE
Our meetings are on the 
Third Wednesday of the month via Zoom
BPWNC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
 
President
Mary Sivila - 530.346.7192
Vice President
open
Secretary
Shirley Hall - 916.826.8944
Treasurer
Shirley Zeff - 530.273.3010
Membership
Deb Armanino LeBlanc
415.786.1160

Program
Our members - Submit an idea to the board.
BPWNC COMMITTEE CONTACTS
 
Scholarship
Lynn Wenzel - 530.477.0746
Judy McCarrick - 530.478.0677
Advocacy
Elaine Sierra - 530.274.0738
Historian
open
Newsletter
Phyllis Orzalli - 530.913.8473
Website
Phyllis Orzalli - 530.913.8473
Facebook
Patricia Wolf - 530.273.0605
BPWNC Facebook
BPWNC
 
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Business & Professional Women of Nevada County · P.O. Box 2642 · Grass Valley, CA 95945 · USA

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