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The Landing: where data and forests meet.

I'm having more conversations with colleagues and graduate students about the need for better presentations by forestry researchers. Even with many conferences moving online in response to COVID-19, the value of quality presentations is not going away.

For those of us that work with quantitative data, weneed to not only explain our story but also the data, numbers, and trends that go along with it. Great presentations come from data and analyses that are communicated clearly.

A new post below describes how forestry researchers can use a call-to-action in their presentation to better engage with their audience.

What was the last great presentation you watched on a forestry topic? I'd love to hear your thoughts with a reply to this email. 


Matt Russell 

GRAPH OF THE MONTH
What role does site productivity play in forests that are changing? About 22% of US forest conditions were disturbed from by something between 1997 and 2017, but it varies by region. Here's a closer look into the relationships between site productivity and disturbances across the US.
Read the post.

Attention forestry researchers: add a call-to-action in your presentation

We've all attended talks by researchers, but maybe wanted more from the presentation. Matt writes about the importance of researchers adding a call-to-action in their presentations. 

How do we quantify site productivity?

Not all forests are created equally. Here are four metrics of site productivity used in forestry.

Minnesota's Carbon Challenge

Matt was a guest on KAXE radio in Grand Rapids, MN describing an interactive project with the public to learn more about the carbon in their trees and woodlands. 
If a forester knows how measurements like wood volume relate to carbon, he or she can feel empowered when discussing the importance of forests and forest management in the context of carbon with landowners and decision makers.

New blog post describes a simple way to calculate carbon from traditional forestry measurements.

 
Read the post.
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