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Issue: 7  Volume: 2  Spring 2013
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Thank you for listening
Book and Video Launch

Professor Patrick McGorry launched Thank you for listening at Fitzroy Town Hall on Tuesday 3 December. The creative writing anthology and video are the culmination of a year of writing workshops, mentoring and reflection by a group of people who have lost a loved one to suicide.
 
In launching the book Prof McGorry emphasised the importance of talking about suicide in preventing further tragedies. He said: “I’ve never come across a situation that is improved by suppressing discussion.” (More)
 

(L-R) Louise Flynn, Sally Parnell (JSS Acting CEO), Rebecca Lister and Professor Patrick McGorry

Why It's OK To Talk About Suicide
By Kieran Largey

 

This is the speech given by Kieran at the start of the World Suicide Prevention Day Walk in September. More than 500 people came together on a Sunday morning to walk alongside the Yarra River, to Federation Square and back to South Yarra, to remember loved ones and highlight suicide prevention. This annual event is organised by Support After Suicide, Lifeline and The Compassionate Friends.
 

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My name is Kieran. I’m a dad, a husband, a father. And a person affected by the suicide of a loved one: our son Sean.

Sean was fun-loving person; always one to help out, one to share family occasions, a young man who had so much ahead of him. But unfortunately it just didn’t work out the way I imagined it would. Sean took his own life at the age of 26. Never did I ever think that I would be in this position. Never did I realise the impact suicide would have on me. (More)

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To My Fellow Travellers
By Dina Monaghan

These are the thoughts of Dina at the conclusion of her participation in an 8-week Early Bereavement group with four other women. They have all lost their sons to suicide.

Ours is a heart-breaking journey. We lost out boys and there is nothing we can do to change that. And, since we are mothers, we need to ‘do something’. When we can’t, we feel lost. And we grieve. We grieve for not being able to hug our boys one more time; we grieve for never seeing their smile, nor hearing their footsteps ever again. For us this place, where we are now, becomes so final and so unreal.

None of us have ever imagined ourselves being here; but we are. (More)

I can't be fixed, so don't try

By Maria Bradshaw
 

Today is the fourth anniversary of the suicide of my only child. Since Toran's death, I have been involved in 9 government enquiries into the circumstances that let him to end his life including an inquest that spanned 3 months.

During the inquest I learned techniques for numbing myself. I had to. How else do you survive listening to a pathologist describe what happened to your child's body and brain when he hanged himself.

How do you not become homicidal when a psychiatric registrar smirks at you and says that two weeks after he prescribed your child Prozac, when told of the suicide, couldn't recall your child's face or name? (More)

Gardening For Life

By Heather Brunton

The healing power of gardening cannot be underestimated.

I have always enjoyed gardening.
From my earliest childhood memories, save my teenage years when I was too intent upon partying, through to the early years of my children's lives, I have had a garden in one form or another.

It was only when my son died that I realised the full impact that a garden can have on one's spirit and state of mind. (More) 

A Student Counsellor’s Experience.
By Su-Rose McIntyre


How lucky I have been to be able to have a student placement experience, Support After Suicide.

I am in the final months of a Monash University’s Masters in Counselling course - the final unit being a field placement with the aim that I learn from the wisdom and collective experience of those involved in the active role of bereavement counselling.

This I certainly did, but must add that I also acquired many insights and important knowledge during my weeks at the service, that surpassed my expectations. (More)


 

Calling All Cyclists

Are you interested in being part of a cycling event that Support After Suicide is looking at developing for 2014?
Even if you feel like you are not a strong rider, you can still be a part of the team. Ways you could be involved include;

- Being part of the committee
- Assisting in the organisation of the ride
- Being part of the support crew
- Seeking the support and assistance of other organisations (e.g. Bicycle Network Victoria, Victoria Police)

If you are interested, please call Support After Suicide on 9421 7640 or email Colin.
Happy riding.
 

 

Book Review
By Heather Brunton

If I had read this book without knowing the author I might well have thought it to be someone like J.K. Rowling for its magical element.
Witches on the Road Tonight by Sheri Holman, (Atlantic Monthly Press, New York, 2011) turned out to be my personal favourite as it is filled with the zany, the uncanny, the weird and the wonderful.
It sounds like a rather dark read but it is really about how each of us affects others. Set in the Appalachian Mountains and New York, it moves from the 1920s to the present day through three generations of one family. (More)
 

    Links 

  • CHRISTMAS is hard when you have lost a loved one to suicide. Support After Suicide has some practical suggestions here to help you manage the holiday season. Handling special occasions and Special Occasions
  • CURRENT STATISTICS show that same sex attracted Australians are 14 times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers. So it’s important that families respond appropriately to a young person who is questioning their sexuality or gender. Beyond Blue has recently published Families like mine a resource which aims to help families do so.
  • AN ARTICLE in The Age is a good insight into the grief of bereaved adult children and the need to talk about suicide rather than hide it. Click here
  • RESEARCH PROJECT about suicide in LGBTI communities: If an LGBTI person close to you has died by suicide and you would be willing to be interviewed about the factors surrounding their death you may be interested in this research project. It’s being conducted by the Australian Institute for Suicide research and Prevention (AISRAP) at Griffith University in conjunction with BeyondBlue. For more information Click here.
  • CONVERSATIONS MATTER: a practical online resource to support safe and effective community discussions about suicide.

What's On

January
Wed 22nd - Serious Fun 10am-1pm
Thurs 23rd  - Beach Day Out
Tues 28th - Bereaved Adult Children 6.30 -8.30pm

February
Wed 12th – Coffee Morning 10am-12pm
Thur 13th - Men’s Program – 7-9pm
Tues 18th – Bereaved Partners – 6.30-8.30pm
Wed 19th – Third Wednesday Group

 
Copyright © 2013 Support After Suicide, All rights reserved.


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