Copy
C.U.S.P. Newsletter, informative news and notes for Single Parents.
C.U.S.P. (Commited to Uplifting Single Parents)

C.U.S.P. Newsletter

Our Mission: It is our mission to empower and assist single parents with the difficult challenges of parenthood through a range of financial and social services which will allow them to provide safe and loving homes for their children. 

About Us: C.U.S.P. (Committed to Uplifting Single Parents) a  501(c)(3) nonprofit organization providing connections to resources, social services and wealth building programs for single-parent families in the Los Angeles area and its surrounding communities.  

                    
 
 
  
 
Calculate purchases by hours worked instead of cost. Take the amount of the item you're considering purchasing and divide it by your hourly wage. If it’s a $75 pair of shoes and you make $15 an hour, ask yourself if those shoes are really worth five long hours of work.

 

SINGLE  PARENTING

 

Teenagers Relationships:
Romance & Intimacy

 

   
Early teenage relationships often involve exploring physical intimacy and sexual feelings. You might not feel ready for this, but you have an important role in guiding and supporting your child through this important developmental stage.

 
About teenage relationships


Romantic relationships are a major developmental milestone. They come with all the other changes going on during adolescence – physical, social and emotional. And they’re linked to your child’s growing interest in body image and looks, independence, and privacy.

Romantic relationships can bring lots of emotional ups and downs for your child – and sometimes for the whole family. The idea that your child might have these kinds of feelings can sometimes be a bit confronting for you. But these feelings are leading your child towards a deeper capacity to care, share and develop intimate relationships.
 

When teenage relationships start


There isn’t a ‘right age’ to start having relationships every child is different, and every family will feel differently about this issue. But here are some averages:

  • From 9-11 years, your child might start to show more independence from your family and more interest in friends.
  • From 10-14 years, your child might want to spend more time in mixed-gender groups, which might eventually end up in a romantic relationship.
  • From 15-19 years, romantic relationships can become central to social life. Friendships might become deeper and more stable.

Many teenagers spend a lot of time thinking and talking about being in a relationship. In these years, teenage relationships might last only a few weeks or months. It’s also normal for children to have no interest in romantic relationships until their late teens. Some choose to focus on schoolwork, sport or other interests.
 

First crushes


Before your child starts having relationships, he might have one or more crushes.

An identity crush is when your child finds someone she admires and wants to be like.

A romantic crush is the beginning of romantic feelings. It’s about your child imagining another person as perfect or ideal. This can tell you a lot about the things that your child finds attractive in people.

Romantic crushes tend not to last very long because ideas of perfection often break down when your child gets to know the other person better. But your child’s intense feelings are real, so it’s best to take crushes seriously and not make fun of them.
 

Early teenage relationships


Younger teenagers usually hang out together in groups. They might meet up with someone special among friends, and then gradually spend more time with that person alone.

If your child wants to go out alone with someone special, talking about it with him can help you get a sense of whether he’s ready. Does he want a boyfriend or girlfriend just because his friends do? Does he think it’s the only way to go out and have fun? Or does he want to spend time getting to know someone better?

If the person your child is interested in is older or younger, it could be worth mentioning that people of different ages might want different things from relationships.


Talking about teenage relationships with your child


Your family plays a big part in the way your child thinks about teenage relationships.

When you encourage conversations about feelings, friendships, and family relationships, it can help your child feel confident to talk about teenage relationships in general. If your child knows what respectful relationships look like in general, she can relate this directly to romantic relationships.

These conversations might mean that your child will feel more comfortable sharing his feelings with you as he starts to get romantically interested in others. And the conversations can also bring up other important topics, like treating other people kindly, breaking up kindly and respecting other people’s boundaries.

Having conversations with your child about sex and relationships from a young age might mean your child feels more comfortable to ask you questions as she moves into adolescence.

In some ways, talking about romantic and/or sexual teenage relationships is like talking about friendships or going to a party. Depending on your values and family rules, you and your child might need to discuss behavior and ground rules, and consequences for breaking the rules. For example, you might talk about how much time your child spends with his girlfriend or boyfriend versus how much time he spends studying, or whether it’s OK for his girlfriend or boyfriend to stay over.

You might also want to agree on some strategies for what your child should do if she feels unsafe or threatened.

Young people might also talk to their friends, which is healthy and normal. They still need your back-up, though, so keeping the lines of communication open is important.

Some conversations about relationships can be difficult, especially if you feel your child isn’t ready for a relationship. Check out our article about difficult conversations for more tips on how to handle them.


Sex and teenage relationships


If your child is in a relationship, it can bring up questions about sex and intimacy.

Not all teenage relationships include sex, but most teenagers will experiment with sexual behavior at some stage. This is why your child needs clear information on contraception, safe sex and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

This could also be your chance to talk together about dealing with unwanted sexual and peer pressure. If you keep the lines of communication open and let your child know that you’re there to listen, he’ll be more likely to come to you with questions and concerns.
 

Same-sex attraction and early sexual experimentation


For some young people, sexual development during adolescence will include same-sex attraction and experiences.

For 3-10% of young people, the start of puberty will mean realizing they’re attracted to people of the same sex. A larger number of young people might develop a bisexual attraction.

If your child feels confused about his feelings or attraction to someone else, responding positively and non-judgmentally is a good first step. A big part of this is being clear about your own feelings about same-sex attraction. If you think you might have trouble being calm and positive, there might be another adult who both you and your child trust and who your child could talk with about his feelings.


Extra help with teenage relationships


Many people and services can help you with support and information – in person, online or on the phone. You could try:

  • your general practitioner
  • the school counselor
  • your local community health center
  • Planned Parenthood or a similar facility


Teenage relationships for children with additional needs


A child with additional needs has the same interest in and the need for information about sex and relationships as other teenagers. Rates of sexual activity for young people with additional needs are the same as those for teenagers without additional needs.

Make sure your child has developmentally appropriate sex education at home and at school. Your health professional, local community resources and relevant support groups should be able to give you help or advice.
 

 

 

 

 


 

Across South Los Angeles and neighboring cities, people just like you are proving you can start small and think big. South LA Savers are setting financial goals, tracking their spending and taking control of their financial future. Our tips and tools can help you set goals, develop strategies to reach those goals, and start saving. Now is the time! Take financial action today! “Start small, think big” and make your dreams a reality! 

Like us on Facebook.


 
Inner City Youth Empowerment (ICYE): A youth empowerment initiative of C.U.S.P. Inc. a 501c3 nonprofit organization based in Los Angeles, CA. ICYE utilizes a variety of strategies to engage youth and young adults ages 12-25. ICYE will provide classes, seminars, conference, and collaborate with other community organizations on programs and events. We will also share tools, tips, and resources.

Like us on Facebook.


 
 




California Black
Chamber Foundation
Scholarship Opportunity


(View)




Aerospace Youth Day



(View)




Father-Daughter Dance



(View)




School Supply Giveaway



(View)




Black College Tour



(View)




School is Cool



(View)




FREE Movies in the Park



(View)
.
Copyright © 2019 C.U.S.P. Inc., All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:

815 N. La Brea Ave. #485 Inglewood, CA 90302 







This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
C.U.S.P. (Commited to Uplifting Single Parents) · 815 N. La Brea Ave. #485 · Inglewood, CA 90302 · USA

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp