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C.U.S.P. Newsletter, informative news and notes for Single Parents.
C.U.S.P. (Commited to Uplifting Single Parents)

C.U.S.P. Newsletter

Our Mission: It is our mission to empower and assist single parents with the difficult challenges of parenthood through a range of financial and social services which will allow them to provide safe and loving homes for their children. 

About Us: C.U.S.P. (Committed to Uplifting Single Parents) a  501(c)(3) nonprofit organization providing connections to resources, social services and wealth building programs for single-parent families in the Los Angeles area and its surrounding communities.  

                                

 
  

 

Are your kids asking these common questions about money? Here’s how to answer them:  Answers  #BetterMoneyHabits #ASW18 


 

SINGLE  PARENTING



Talking to your children about the recent spate of school shootings   
 


 

Few events hit home for children and families like a school shooting. When children see such an event on television or on Web-based news flashes, it is natural for them to worry about their own school and their own safety, particularly if the violence occurred nearby or in a neighboring city or state.

Talk to your children

Psychologists who work in the area of trauma and recovery advise parents to use the troubling news of school shootings as an opportunity to talk and listen to their children. It is important, say these psychologists, to be honest. Parents should acknowledge to children that bad things do happen, but also reassure them with the information that many people are working to keep them safe, including their parents, teachers and local police.

Young children may communicate their fears through play or drawings. Elementary school children will use a combination of play and talk to express themselves. Adolescents are more likely to have the skills to communicate their feelings and fears verbally. Adults should be attentive to a child's concerns, but also try to help the children put their fears into proportion to the real risk. Again, it is important to reassure children that the adults in their lives are doing everything they can to make their environment — school, home, and neighborhood — safe for them.

Parents, teachers and school administrators also need to communicate with one another not only about how to keep kids safe but about which children might need more reassurance and the best way to give it to them.

Limit exposure to news coverage

Parents should also monitor how much exposure a child has to news reports of traumatic events, including these recent school shootings. Research has shown that some young children believe that the events are reoccurring each time they see a television replay of the news footage.

Know the warning signs

Most children are quite resilient and will return to their normal activities and personality relatively quickly, but parents should be alert to any signs of anxiety that might suggest that a child or teenager might need more assistance. Such indicators could be a change in the child's school performance, changes in relationships with peers and teachers, excessive worry, school refusal, sleeplessness, nightmares, headaches or stomachaches, or loss of interest in activities that the child used to enjoy. Also, remember that every child will respond to trauma differently. Some will have no ill effects; others may suffer an immediate and acute effect. Still, others may not show signs of stress until sometime after the event.   - American Psychological Association

What It Was Like Talking to My Two Sons About School Shootings  - J.W. Holland
 

 

How to Teach Boundaries to an Overly Affectionate Child


Before children can talk, they understand affection through touch. They are soothed by being held. They smile at a kiss, or a finger stroked across their cheek. They cling to their parents for comfort. But, as they grow old enough to communicate affection with words, many kids continue to show affection physically or demand it. Often these open displays of physical affection can make adults feel uncomfortable or put children that don't understand boundaries in danger. Fortunately, there are ways for parents to help kids understand that they are loved and also that they can’t hug everyone all the time.
 

Signs that a Child is Overly Affectionate:

  • Talking to strangers about their personal life
  • Sitting on the lap of a non-family member or acquaintance
  • Running up to and hugging a stranger on the street
  • Being overly clingy and huggy to family members
  • Asking to “cuddle” or sleep with family members excessively
  • Needing hugs or touch more than 5 times per day
  • Asking non-family members for personal care
 

How to Deal with an Overly Affectionate Child

  • Model good personal boundaries as well as physical boundaries with partners, friends, and other family members.
  • Don’t react to boundary violations with anger.
  • Remind children that it’s important to ask before hugging and kissing anyone, that it’s about respect.
  • Be vigilant in teaching stranger danger and helping kids understand where and how they can be touched, as well as who to talk to if they are touched inappropriately. Read More

 

    
 

 


In accordance with our mission to provide you with the best in support services, we are very excited to tell you that C.U.S.P. has partnered with Apprisen.


, a professional provider of financial counseling who has serviced families all across the United States for nearly 60 years. Apprisen's mission is to help people improve their financial well-being through counseling, community outreach, and financial education.
(Get Started)

 

A free e-book is written just for you. 

Download a free copy now and you will find answers to many of your most urgent personal finance questions.


 


C.U.S.P. continues to strive to connect you with resources that allow you to live YOUR BEST LIFE! We are happy to have these partnerships and look forward to your success. 


 

Across South Los Angeles and neighboring cities, people just like you are proving you can start small and think big. South LA Savers are setting financial goals, tracking their spending and taking control of their financial future. Our tips and tools can help you set goals, develop strategies to reach those goals, and start saving. Now is the time! Take financial action today! “Start small, think big” and make your dreams a reality! Enroll in South LA Saves today!


 
Inner City Youth Empowerment (ICYE): A youth empowerment initiative of C.U.S.P. Inc. a 501c3 nonprofit organization based in Los Angeles, CA. ICYE utilizes a variety of strategies to engage youth and young adults ages 12-25. ICYE will provide classes, seminars, conference, and collaborate with other community organizations on programs and events. We will also share tools, tips, and resources.

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815 N. La Brea Ave. #485 Inglewood, CA 90302 







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C.U.S.P. (Commited to Uplifting Single Parents) · 815 N. La Brea Ave. #485 · Inglewood, CA 90302 · USA

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