Copy
July 12, 2016 - Sustainable Pittsburgh
Energy Innovation (EI) is a biweekly newsletter of the
Energy for the Power of 32 initiative
EI Energy Innovation
news and events accelerating sustainable development for the power of 32
Upcoming Events

July 14th, 2016 (1:00 pm)
WEBINAR
Presented by:Advanced Energy Economy

 
There have been a lot of discussions around the country of late about the regulatory changes needed to create a 21st century electricity system. New regulatory approaches and utility business models are needed to integrate higher levels of distributed energy resources, take advantage of new technologies, meet environmental goals, and address changing customer needs and expectations. In an industry that has been slow to change historically, there is a lot at stake for utilities, advanced energy companies, and consumers. In order to understand what transformations are needed, it’s first necessary to understand how electric utilities make money today.

In this webinar the utility business models will be looked at, as well as the exploration of the fact that one size does not fit all.

Moderator:
  • Hannah Polikov, Director, Public Utility Commission Program, AEE
Panel:
  • Larry Kellerman, Managing Partner, Twenty First Century Utilities
  • Coley Girouard, Associate, Public Utility Commission Program, AEE

July 20th, 2016 (10:00 am - 5:00 pm)
Power Center at Duquesne University
1015 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh 15282
Presented by:Environmental Entrepreneurs & Duquesne University

 


Cost: $40, includes lunch and networking reception
Contact: Sharon Pillar at pillarsharon@gmail.com or (412) 215-5995

Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2) in partnership with Duquesne University’s Center for Green Industries is sponsoring the Clean Jobs PA Forum. The forum will highlight the Clean Jobs PA report about thousands of clean energy jobs in Pennsylvania as well as unveil the Clean Jobs PA Mapping Project that illustrates where renewable energy generation sites and clean energy businesses are located throughout the state.

Attendees will hear from leading experts about current clean energy policy and from award-winning businesses that are leading the way in creating jobs in the clean energy economy. Speakers include leaders from E2, Duquesne University School of Green Industries, Berner Industries, EverPower Wind, eCap Network, Aquion Energy, Keystone Energy Efficiency Association, Natural Resources Defense Council, organized labor, state officials, and more.

Portions of this forum are participatory. Attendees will contribute information about policy ideas that grow the clean energy market, and also have a chance to showcase their company/organization in 30-second “elevator” speech during lightning round introductions that precede the networking reception (featuring local microbrews).
 

July 21st, 2016 (3:00 pm - 6:00 pm)
PITT OHIO (Strip District)
15 27th St. Pittsburgh, PA 15222
Presented by: The Green Building Alliance

 
This event presents various perspectives including building owner/property manager, product manufacturer, utility, and more, sharing information and insights about renewable energy technology that can get your building to zero energy. This is great information for vendors and building owners alike, including Property Partners in the Pittsburgh 2030 District!

Participants are welcome to attend one event in this series, or enjoy all four!
 

July 25th - 29th, 2016 (*times TBD*)
The Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center

215 Innovation Blvd, State College, PA 16803
Presented by: Sustainable Energy Fund

 
Energypath is the region's largest sustainable energy event attracting industry professionals, policymakers and academia throughout the region and across the United States. The goal of Energypath is to increase the knowledge of and passion for sustainable energy in the leaders of today and tomorrow.
 

August 8th - 12th, 2016 (*times vary, see agenda*)
Sheraton Station Square Hotel
300 West Station Square Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15219
Presented by: National Energy Technology Laboratory

 
For further information regarding the program content, please contact David Lang at:
U.S. Department of Energy
National Energy Technology Laboratory
P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15236
Phone: (412) 386-4881
E-mail: David.Lang@netl.doe.gov

For questions regarding conference logistics, please contact Karen Lockhart, CMP at:
NETL Event Management
P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15236
Telephone: (412) 386-4763
Fax: (412) 386-6486
E-mail: karen.lockhart@netl.doe.gov

October 26th - 27th, 2016 (*times vary, see agenda*)
Waterfront Place Hotel
2 WaterFront Place, Morgantown, WV 26501
Presented by: TransTech Energy Research & Business Development Program

 
Who should attend:
  • Innovators and entrepreneurs: Pitch your company or project to investors, potential strategic partners, and project developers
  • Investors: Find emerging transitional energy and environmental technology companies with near term payback potential
  • Energy companies and manufacturers: Develop strategic partnerships with start-up companies and project developers
  • All: Join the discussion! Let’s build on the momentum of TransTech and generate some excitement about the possibilities for new companies, advanced manufacturing, and competitive industries!
Resources
 

Pennsylvania environmental regulators started their review of permit applications for a multibillion-dollar pipeline expansion across the state and are scheduling hearings to take public comment on the controversial project.

Philadelphia-based Sunoco Logistics has proposed a 350-mile line called Mariner East 2 to carry natural gas liquids such as propane from Marcellus shale wells in Western Pennsylvania to the company's Marcus Hook export terminal on the Delaware River. It's an expansion of — and will generally run parallel to — the smaller, retrofitted Mariner East pipeline that went online this year, and is expected to be finished in the second quarter of 2017.
 

President Barack Obama galvanized attention around this issue in February 2013, when he challenged U.S. citizens, businesses and communities to double their energy productivity by 2030. Doing so wouldn’t just save $327 billion annually in power bills, it also could create more than 1.3 million jobs, according to an analysis by the Alliance to Save Energy. Plus it could cut carbon dioxide emissions by 33 percent.

...Instead of rising, the price of electricity in the nation’s largest grid is now 40 percent lower, even as a record 346 coal-burning units, producing enough electricity to supply 40 million homes, were retired. The difference: America’s shale boom unleashed cheap and abundant natural gas that burns more cleanly than coal.
 

The price of most goods we purchase is generally based on the costs associated with its production, including the raw materials used to generate it, the labor associated with its manufacturing, and so on. However, when it comes to pricing residential electricity, many regulators choose to use a flat price per unit of electricity (kilowatt-hours, or kWh) that unfortunately fails to adequately reflect the underlying costs of generating and delivering energy to our homes.
 

Current discussions on how to improve education have focused on better teachers, better technology, and more funding (which deepens the debate on who should pay for it). But consider that each year K–12 schools spend more than $8 billion on energy—more than they spend on computers and textbooks combined. Too commonly overlooked is the opportunity to cost-effectively improve our nation’s schools and enhance student performance by tackling the performance of the very buildings in which children, faculty, and staff spend more than eight hours each day.
 

Tax credits and efficiency standards for appliances and vehicles have been key drivers for increasing renewable energy use and energy efficiency in the United States. Extending these policies and increasing the stringency of the Clean Power Plan beyond 2030 would reduce energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by reducing motor fuel use and energy use in buildings by increasing efficiency and by increasing the share of solar and wind in the electricity generation mix.
 
Our mailing address is:
Sustainable Pittsburgh • 307 Fourth Avenue • Suite 1500 • Pittsburgh, PA, 15222 • USA
Unsubscribe
Subscribe