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NEW URBAN AGENDA
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2016
 

The New Urban Agenda 

The WASH ePaper is an online magazine published at regular intervals in several languages. Each issue takes a closer look at a current key issue in the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector and related areas. It also provides updates on forthcoming national and international events, news, current publications and projects from the sector. The WASH ePaper is published by the German Toilet Organization (GTO) in close cooperation with the German WASH Network and the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA). Previous issues of the WASH ePaper can be found here.

Issue #6


On the eve of the HABITAT-III Conference in Quito from October  17-20, 2016, the sixth issue of the WASH ePaper is devoted to the central topic of the conference, the "New Urban Agenda“. The current edition reflects the discussion and the strategic options in the WASH sector, addressing the New Urban Agenda's blueprint for the management of urban water supply and sanitation. The content of this issue is mainly based on presentations from the Conference “Key Elements of a New Urban Agenda”, organised by BORDA in Bremen, Germany. 

CONTENT OF THIS ISSUE:


01  Rationale and Working Results of the "New Urban Agenda" Conference

02  East Asian Tigers – Lessons for the SDGs

03  Scaling Up Small-Scale Sanitation – Experiences from Egypt

04  Citywide Sanitation Planning – Insights from India and Bangladesh

05  How to make sanitation planning work?

06  Establishing O&M and M&E Schemes – Experiences from Indonesia

07  Key Elements of a New Urban Agenda – Interview with Stefan Reuter

08  Cities as Key Actors of the Agenda 2030

09  Relevant Dates and Events 2016/2017

10  Key WASH Publications and Resources


01

Rationale and Working Results of the "New Urban Agenda" Conference


At the invitation of BORDA, 83 representatives from the public and private sector, civil society, academia, media, and international donor organisations from Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America met on November 10 and 11, 2015 at the House of Parliament in Bremen, Germany to discuss strategic options for addressing the management of urban waters and sanitation in the New Urban Agenda. The conference was organised as a response to the need for action that had been identified at previous conferences, such as the 2015 World Water Forum in South Korea and the World Water Week in Stockholm. Below you will find the rationale and working results from the conference.
 
The full text you can find here


02

How did the East Asian Tigers Deliver Sanitation within a Generation: Lessons for the Sustainable Development Goals

In 1960, when South Korea made the strategic choice to push for total sanitation, its per capita income levels were less than those in Ghana, Zambia, and Senegal. For the East Asian Tigers, sanitation was front and centre of their national development strategies. It was formative in their nation-building project. So, how did they do it? 

Under the following links you will find the full text and a video snippet from the presentation of Henry Northover, WaterAid (UK).
 
The full text you can find here
The video of the presentation you can find here


03

Scaling Up Small-Scale Sanitation in a Disabling Institutional and Regulatory Environment: Experiences from Egypt

Rather than replicating a large number of discrete projects, scaling up requires integrative management and institutional schemes, innovative financing plans, and effective inclusion of the private sector. Egypt currently displays a “disabling environment” for scaling up small-scale sanitation.

Under the following links you will find the full text and a video snippet from the presentation of Philippe Reymond from Eawag/Sandec (Switzerland).
 
The full text you can find here
The video of the presentation you can find here

 


04

Citywide Sanitation Planning: Insights from India and Bangladesh

In India, many cities claim that they have a high coverage of sewerage while in reality half the sewage may be going untreated into natural water bodies, as we discovered in the course of our sanitation planning efforts in various cities. Citywide sanitation plans should aim to create an ecosystem of decentralised sanitation services.

Under the following links you will find the full text and a video snippet from the presentation of B.R. Balachandran, BORDA and CDD Society (India).
 
The full text you can find here
The video of the presentation you can find here

 


05

How to Make Urban and Sanitation Planning Work? Lessons Learnt from West Africa, South East Asia, Madagascar, and Haiti

What are the main challenges to make sanitation programmes at the municipal level successful? What bottlenecks and mistakes in international cooperation should be avoided? What is needed from national and local players and the international community to ensure integrated management of used water and sanitation (especially for the West African region)? This paper will give some suggestions to answer these questions, based on the experience of field projects.

Under the following links you will find the full text and a video snippet from the presentation of Julien Gabert, GRET (France).
 
The full text you can find here
The video of the presentation you can find here

 


06

Establishing Sustainable O&M and M&E Schemes for Community-Based Sanitation Infrastructure: Experiences from Indonesia

The Indonesian National Medium-Term Development Plan 2015 – 2019 aims to increase the sanitation access from current levels of 60.9 % to 100 %. Due to this plan, it is estimated that at least another 2,000 decentralised wastewater treatment systems will be implemented every year by different stakeholders. To support the National Plan, BORDA Indonesia and its local partner organisations are implementing about 200-300 DEWATS each year for Community-Based Sanitation (CBS) projects throughout Indonesia, in particular in densely populated, urban and peri-urban, low-income areas.

Under the following links you will find the full text and a video snippet from the presentation of Marina Brückner and Mirko Dietrich, BORDA (Indonesia).
 
The full text you can find here
The video of the presentation you can find here

 


07

Key Elements of a New Urban Agenda

The water and sanitation targets of Millennium Development Goal 7 were not met in many countries. In September 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Sustainable Development Goal 6, which is designated to ensure “availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all” by the year 2030.

The interview with Stefan Reuter (director, BORDA) under the link below is exploring the question if we need new models for managing water resources in order to achieve the new goal.
 
The full interview you can find here

 


08

Cities as Key Actors of the Agenda 2030: More than just a Buzzword

Every 20 years, the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) organises a global Conference on Human Settlements. At the end of October, the third Habitat conference will take place in Quito (Ecuador), which will be concluded by the adoption of a New Urban Agenda by the community of states. While the final text of the document is still being negotiated, the main objective of the Agenda is already clear: How to strengthen cities in their central functions with regard to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Against this background the current issue of "development in brief" from Solveigh Buhl (KfW)  gives a summary of the ongoing debate and explains the prerequisites that must be put in place in order to better enable cities to address and solve their specific challenges on their own.

The "development in brief" document you can find here

 


09

Relevant Dates in 2016 / 2017

October 15, 2016
Global Handwashing Day
October 17-20, 2016
Habitat III
Quito, Ecuador
October 25, 2016
5th Virtual MHM & WASH in Schools Conference
October 27, 2016
WASH Tech Day
Berlin, Germany
November 9, 2016
Research for Nutrition Conference
Paris, France
November 19, 2016
World Toilet Day
November 22-23, 2016
Annual Global WASH Cluster Meeting
Katmandu, Nepal
November 28-30, 2016
Budapest Water Summit
Budapest, Hungary
Nov 29 - Dec 1, 2016
7th Rural Water Supply Network (RWSN) Forum
Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire
January, 2017
SuSanA  - 10th Anniversary
Eschborn, Germany
February 2017
SUN Global Gathering
February 19-23, 2017
FSM4 Conference
Chennai, India
February 25-27, 2017
WasteSafe 2017
Khulna, Bangladesh
March 2-4, 2017
4th International Conference on Nutrition and Growth
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
March 19-23, 2017
4th Arab Water Week
Dead Sea, Jordan
March 20-22, 2017
Hidden Hunger - 3rd International Congress
Stuttgart, Germany
March 22, 2017
World Water Day
April 18-21, 2017
SWA High Level Meeting 
Washington DC, US
May 28, 2017
Menstrual Hygiene Day
July 24-28, 2017
40th WEDC Conference
Loughborough, UK
Aug 27 - Sept 1, 2017
World Water Week
Stockholm, Sweden
Oct 30 - Nov 3, 2017
Amsterdam International Water Week
Amsterdam, Netherlands 

 


10

Key Publications and Resources

Key Elements for a New Urban Agenda
Editors: B. Gutterer, S. Reuter 
Publisher:
BORDA
Year/ Location: 2015 / Bremen

SDG 6 “Ensure access to water and sanitation for all” and its targets can only be achieved by establishing new models for managing water resources. Such efforts also have to be integrated with strategies and activities to achieve SDG 11 “Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”, and its target “By 2030, ensure access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums”. An increasingly stronger community of practice is addressing the need for adaptive, integrated, and sustainable management of the total water cycle as a key element of a comprehensive new urban agenda. The publication is a summary report of a conference held in Bremen last year to discuss strategic options for addressing the management of of urban waters and sanitation in the New Urban Agenda.

Urban Services During Protracted Armed Conflicts

Authors: ICRC
Publisher: ICRC

Year/ Location: 2015 / Bremen

Urbanisation is constantly on the rise, with cities already absorbing more than half of the world’s population and armed conflicts increasingly being fought in urban settings. Regions facing protracted armed conflict see a steady decline in essential public services, while the relief-rehabilitation-development paradigm and funding mechanisms fail to provide a satisfactory response in these settings. Based on more than 30 years of ICRC experience in protracted armed conflict in urban settings, this report underlines the challenges, describes the characteristics and complexity of essential services, questions current paradigms and proposes new avenues to be explored.
 
Are we doing the right thing? Critical questions for city sanitation planning 

Authors: K. Abeysuriya, A. Kome, N. Carrard, P. Mukheibir, J. Willetts
Publisher: ISF-UTS and SNV

Year/ Location: 2016 / Australia, Netherlands
 
Cities are clear examples of complex and rapidly changing systems, particularly in countries where urban population growth and economic development continue apace, and where the socio-political context strongly influences the directions taken. The concept of double-loop learning can be usefully applied to city sanitation planning. This paper prompts practitioners, policy-makers and development agencies to reflect on their approaches to city sanitation planning and the assumptions that underlie them.

 
Exploring Legal and Policy Aspects of Urban Sanitation and Hygiene 

Authors: ISF-UTS and SNV
Publisher: ISF-UTS and SNV
Year/ Location: 2016 / Australia, Netherlands
 
Cities are clear examples of complex and rapidly changing systems, particularly in countries where urban population growth and economic development continue apace, and where the socio-political context strongly influences the directions taken. The concept of double-loop learning can be usefully applied to city sanitation planning. This paper prompts practitioners, policy-makers and development agencies to reflect on their approaches to city sanitation planning and the assumptions that underlie them.
Scaling Up Group Handwashing in Schools

Authors: Fit for School / International
Publisher: GIZ, UNICEF
Year/ Location: 2016 / USA, Germany

Handwashing with soap is among the most effective hygiene behaviours helping to prevent infectious diseases. The importance of daily group handwashing has been recognized and integrated into the UNICEF/GIZ Three Star Approach (TSA) to WASH in Schools (WinS), which has gained momentum around the world. With its focus o usable, cost-efficient and adequate infrastructure, the TSA provides a realistic stepwise concept to improve WinS infrastructure. To enable group handwashing in schools a variety of facilities have been built in different contexts around the globe. The “Compendium of Group Washing Facilities around the Globe” comprises such examples from Afghanistan, Cambodia, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Kiribati, Lao PDR, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Philippines, Tanzania and Zambia. It aims to inform and inspire WASH practitioners, schools and their communities to strengthen healthy practices and ensure a healthy learning environment for children.
Compendium of WASHplus - Tools and Resources to Facilitate WASH and Nutrition Integration 

Authors: USAID
Publisher: USAID
Year/ Location: 2016 / USA
 
Since 2010, the USAID-funded WASHplus project has been engaged both at the global and country levels in stimulating the discussion and improving the evidence base around integrating WASH into nutrition programming, sharing experiences and approaches to integrating the two sectors. WASH interventions help reduce undernutrition by expanding the development community’s focus to include both intermediate and underlying causes of malnutrition. The overview document elaborates on the background, while the collection of tools and resources can be found on the WASHplus website.
 
Multisectoral Approaches to Improving Nutrition: Water Sanitation and Hygiene

Authors: C. Chase, F. Ngure
Publisher: WSP / Worldbank
Year/ Location: 2016 / USA

Emerging evidence in the WASH sector suggests the linkages between WASH and nutrition may be stronger than previously understood. This has generated a great deal of momentum in both the WASH and nutrition sectors about how the two can work more closely to achieve better outcomes. This paper addresses this objective from both the WASH perspective, on how nutrition-specific programs (as well as nutrition-sensitive social protection, livelihoods, and community-driven development programs) can provide an alternative platform to deliver services at scale and more cost-effectively; and the nutrition perspective, on how WASH interventions can be adapted to include nutritional considerations, making them more nutrition-sensitive, and more impactful on nutrition. This document outlines the rationale for nutrition-sensitive WASH, summarizes the scientific evidence on the pathways through which WASH impacts nutritional outcomes, discusses the challenges and opportunities for nutrition sensitive WASH, and proposes a set of practical strategies and enhancements to existing project design that offer promising opportunities to impact nutritional outcomes. 
Global Nutrition Report 2016 - From Promise to Impact

Authors: GNR Independent Expert Group
Publisher: IFPRI
Year/ Location: 2016 / USA
 
The Global Nutrition Report is the only independent and comprehensive annual review of the state of the world’s nutrition. It is a multipartner initiative that holds a mirror up to successes and failures at meeting intergovernmental nutrition targets. It documents progress on commitments made on the global stage, and it recommends actions to accelerate that progress. The Global Nutrition Report aims to be a beacon, providing examples of change and identifying opportunities for action. This year’s report focuses on the theme of making—and measuring—SMART commitments to nutrition and identifying what it will take to end malnutrition in all its forms by 2030. One chapter is dedicated to the underlying drivers, incl. WASH.
The Missing Ingredients: Are Policy-Makers Doing Enough on Water, Sanitation and Hygiene to End Malnutrition?

Authors: A. Chitty, D. Jones, M. Wilson-Jones
Publisher: WaterAid
Year/ Location: 2016 / UK
 
This report highlights why water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) are essential for nutrition. Through an analysis of nutrition and WASH plans and policies in 13 countries, gaps and ways of working are identified. Rather than just making demands for more integration, the research highlights where this is already being done well at policy level and where and how improvements must be made. A holistic approach is needed that addresses both the basic and underlying causes of undernutrition, which include the education, health, agriculture, and WASH sectors. The development of nutritionsensitive approaches within these sectors is vital to end malnutrition. At the same time, this offers unique opportunities to achieve each sector’s goals.

Feedback and Comments

We value your feedback. Please contact us if you have any general comments, suggestions or contributions for future editions. 


Contact  Robert Gensch  robert.gensch@germantoilet.org

 
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