Share this newsletter:
HOME     WHO WE ARE     LATEST POSTINGS     GWPF NEWSLETTER     CONTACT

CCNet 08/05/15

UK Climate Minister Voted Out, Green LibDems Wiped Out

David Cameron wins majority for Conservatives in Election 2015 victory

 
 
Britain’s Climate Change Secretary Ed Davey has lost his seat to the Conservative party, in an election night that has seen the Liberal Democrats presence in the House of Commons decimated. --The Mirror, 8 May 2015

 
 
 
 

David Cameron has won the general election with an outright majority after Labour was virtually wiped out in Scotland and the Liberal Democrat vote collapsed. Mr Cameron hailed the "sweetest victory" as his party secured the 323 seats needed to form a government without needing to go into coalition. Ed Miliband, the Labour leader, has resigned. Ed Balls, the Shadow Chancellor was the biggest scalp of the night, losing his Leeds seat to the Tories. --The Daily Telegraph, 8 May 2015
 
 
 
1) UK Climate Minister Voted Out, Green LibDems Wiped Out - The Mirror, 8 May 2015
 
2) David Cameron Wins Majority For Conservatives - The Daily Telegraph, 8 May 2015
 
3) David Cameron: 'We'll Scrap Funds For Windfarms' - County Times, 7 May 2015
 
4) Speculation Growing That David Cameron May Abolish DECC - The Sunday Times, 5 April 2015
 
5) New Government Faces Potential Energy Crisis, Warns Expert - The Daily Telegraph, 8 May 2015
 
  
The Prime Minister has pledged to stop future government funding to windfarm projects including the delayed inquiry and to give local people the final say – if he is re-elected today. Mr Cameron pledged to stop the windfarm project and any other on-shore windfarms within Montgomeryshire if he was elected to take a second term in Government. He said: “I want to make it clear that if there is a Conservative Government in place we will remove all subsidy for on-shore wind and local people should have a greater say.” --Ben Goddard, County Times, 7 May 2015
 
 
 
Speculation is growing that energy and climate change department’s days of independence could be numbered. A government source said that if David Cameron is re-elected, he is likely to fold it into the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills, where the government has more staff with commercial experience. --John Collingridge and Danny Fortson, The Sunday Times, 5 April 2015
 
 
 
 
New government will have to address capacity shortfalls to avoid blackouts.  Avoiding a power blackout will be one of the first priorities for whoever forms the next government, a leading consultant has suggested. Critics argue that a focus on renewables has left Britain’s power network now dangerously short of spare capacity. --Andrew Critchlow, The Daily Telegraph, 8 May 2015
 
 
 
 
 
1) UK Climate Minister Voted Out, Green LibDems Wiped Out
The Mirror, 8 May 2015
 
Climate change secretary Ed Davey has lost his seat to the Conservative party, in an election night that has seen the Liberal Democrats presence in the House of Commons decimated.

 

Davey became the first cabinet minister to lose his seat since 1997, when he lost his Kingston and Surbiton seat to Tory challenger James Berry.
 
It came just minutes after Lib Dem business minister Jo Swinson lost her seat to the Scottish National Party.
 
Mr Davey saw a majority of 7,560 votes evaporate to lose the Kingston and Surbiton seat he had held since 1997 to the Conservatives by a margin of almost 3,000 votes.
 
Having been appointed as employment relations, consumer and postal affairs minister in 2010, he was promoted to Energy and Climate Change Secretary in February 2012, after his Lib Dem colleague Chris Huhne was forced to resign when he was charged with perverting the course of justice by making his wife take his speeding points.
 
The job, one of six Cabinet positions the Lib Dems held as junior partners in the coalition, gave the party the chance to exercise their green credentials.
 
Mr Davey claimed credit for leading the bid to secure a “massive increase” in renewable electricity in the UK and for winning concessions from the Treasury over a potential target to slash emissions from the power sector by 2030 and preserving targets to cut emissions in the mid-2020s.
 
And he led negotiations for the UK on the world stage at UN climate talks in Qatar, Poland and Peru.
 
But he admitted earlier this year it was “quite likely” he would no longer be Energy and Climate Change Secretary by the time crucial talks on securing a new global deal to tackle change take place in Paris in December.
 
Full story
 
 

 
2) David Cameron Wins Majority For Conservatives
The Daily Telegraph, 8 May 2015
 
Prime Minister returns to Downing Street victorious as Ed Balls leads the list of Labour and Lib Dem losses
 
David Cameron has won the general election with an outright majority after Labour was virtually wiped out in Scotland and the Liberal Democrat vote collapsed.
 
Mr Cameron hailed the "sweetest victory" as his party secured the 323 seats needed to form a government without needing to go into coalition.
 
It came after an electoral earthquake in Scotland, with Nicola Sturgeon’s SNP seeing unprecedented swings and decimating Labour north of the border.
 
Ed Miliband, the Labour leader, has resigned after saying that he was "deeply sorry" about the result in Scotland. Ed Balls, the Shadow Chancellor was the biggest scalp of the night, losing his Leeds seat to the Tories.
 
In the shock result - which had not been predicted by any opinion poll - Mr Cameron returned to Downing Street in scenes reminiscent of the 1992 general election when John Major triumphed over Neil Kinnock.
 
Speaking to Conservative activists, he hailed a great victory.
 
Full story
 
 
 
3) David Cameron: 'We'll Scrap Funds For Windfarms'
County Times, 7 May 2015
 
Ben Goddard

THE PRIME Minister has pledged to stop future government funding to windfarm projects including the delayed inquiry and to give local people the final say – if he is re-elected today.
 
David Cameron visited Crickhowell on Wednesday when he was quizzed over the delay of any announcement on the results of the Mid Wales Conjoined Wind Farm Inquiry which could see five windfarms built across Powys with each consisting of between 17 and 65 turbines up to 450 feet tall.
 
The five proposed windfarms, which were the subject of a year long planning inquiry, are proposed to be built at Llandinam, Carnedd Wen, Llaithddu, Llanbrynmair and Llanbadarn Fynydd.
 
Despite planning inspector Andrew Poulter handing his recommendations to Secretary of State Ed Davey back on December 8, a decision was made to delay any decision until after this week’s General Election.
 
Mr Cameron pledged to stop the windfarm project and any other on-shore windfarms within Montgomeryshire if he was elected to take a second term in Government.
 
He said: “You would have to ask the environment secretary who took that decision and that was a decision for him.
 
“However, I want to make it clear that if there is a Conservative Government in place we will remove all subsidy for on-shore wind and local people should have a greater say.
 
“Frankly I think we have got enough on-shore wind and we have enough to be going on with, almost 10 per cent of our electricity needs, and I think we should give local people a say if they want to block these sorts of projects.
 
“The only way to stop more on-shore wind is to vote Conservative there is no other party with this policy. We are saying very clearly we would remove the subsidy and give local people the power to say yes or no.
 
“This would end the growth of on-shore wind and if that’s what you care about you must vote Conservative.”
 
Full story
 
 
 
4) Speculation Growing That David Cameron May Abolish DECC
The Sunday Times, 5 April 2015
 
John Collingridge and Danny Fortson
 
Speculation is growing that energy department’s days of independence could be numbered. A government source said that if David Cameron is re-elected, he is likely to fold it into the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills, where the government has more staff with commercial experience.



 
Full story (subscription required)
 
 

 
5) New Government Faces Potential Energy Crisis, Warns Expert
The Daily Telegraph, 8 May 2015
 
Andrew Critchlow
 
New government will have to address capacity shortfalls to avoid blackouts. Critics argue that a focus on renewables has left Britain’s power network now dangerously short of spare capacity.
 
Avoiding a power blackout will be one of the first priorities for whoever forms the next government, a leading consultant has suggested.
 
Ahead of the results of one of the closest elections in decades, Simon Virley, UK chair of energy and natural resources at KPMG, has warned of tight energy capacity in 2015 and 2016.
 
“The next couple of winters are expected to be among the tightest this decade in terms of electricity capacity margins due to announced plant closures; while Britain’s overall dependence on imported energy is soaring as North Sea production declines,” he said.
 
According to KPMG, the margin for power generation this winter could be even lower than the 4.1pc winter outlook provided by National Grid last year following the potential closure of plants at Killingholme and Longannet.
 
Blackouts have been a persistent concern for UK business. Last year National Grid was forced to unveil a series of measures to keep more power generation in reserve in an effort to boost spare capacity to 6pc, a level perceived to be a safe threshold.
 
National Grid’s forecasts show that without the emergency measures an exceptionally cold winter last year could have cut the margin to 2.8pc, assuming full imports of power from the continent, and eaten into reserve margins if imports were unavailable.
 
“This is a challenging in-tray for whoever takes on this brief in the new government, even before the overlay of new policies or a spending review, which will be tough for unprotected departments like DECC,” said Mr Virley.
 
Meanwhile, plans for Britain’s first new nuclear plant in a generation at Hinkley Point still depend on receiving final investment approval from French utility EDF. The company said last year it wanted to decide on the £24.5bn project in Somerset by the end of March but that deadline has now slipped.
 
Full story
Follow on Twitter    Forward to Friend 
Copyright © 2015 The Global Warming Policy Forum, All rights reserved.
unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences