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Fall 2019: #1Thing, One Movement for DVAM
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For Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) this October, we are amplifying the Domestic Violence Awareness Project's call for collective action around this year's theme, #1Thing, One Movement, as we move forward together toward social transformation. The Domestic Violence Awareness Project is committed to promoting proactive efforts to shift the cultural rules, norms and constructs that support gender-based violence and support the health and well-being of individuals, families, communities, and institutions. In the words of VAWnet TA Question of the Month authors Micaela Rios Anguiano and Kelly Miller from the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence, we envision "beloved communities with social equity and collective liberation, where we see our own and each other’s full humanity, and everyone can thrive."

Preventing domestic violence requires the collective action and power of individuals, families, institutions, and systems – each whose #1Thing adds a valuable and powerful component to transforming our communities. Together, Awareness + Action = Social Change!

This issue of the PreventIPV newsletter highlights resources that emphasize the importance of fostering collaboration in order to build beloved communities and a connected movement. This newsletter also features our newest DELTA FOCUS story from the Innovation section of the PreventIPV website, which explores the key role of policy-based prevention efforts. In alignment with the weekly topical themes NRCDV is highlighting for DVAM throughout October, we are featuring prevention tools related to:

  • Serving Male Survivors
  • The Intersection of Housing and Domestic Violence
  • The Integration of Awareness and Prevention 
  • Supporting Older Survivors
government building

NEW POLICY-BASED PREVENTION STORY

“Policy-oriented approaches addressing community- and societal-level risks have the potential to create population-level impact and produce cross-cutting effects on multiple forms of violence.”

This story features coalitions in California, Florida, and North Carolina who used policy-based approaches to have a community-level impact on IPV. The lessons described within highlight the importance of considering the context in which policy is developed and implemented, engaging partners with the right skills at the right time, and providing supports to intended audiences in order to accomplish policy goals.

READ MORE

NATIONAL IPV PREVENTION COUNCIL MEETING

The Steering Committee came together in Atlanta this September to share lessons learned from prevention initiatives across the United States, discuss current happenings of note in the prevention field and begin the strategic planning process for fiscal years 2020-2025. The group is excited about their vision for engaging diverse voices and partnering with local communities to advance a comprehensive national prevention agenda and broaden support for its implementation at the national, state, territory and local levels. 

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AWARENESS HIGHLIGHTS

#1Thing, One Movement: Working Together Towards Collective Liberation

Division is a tool of oppression. The remedy is collaboration. Check out the DVAP's latest Awareness Highlights blog post for insight on how we can advance our efforts to end domestic violence as a unified movement.


READ MORE

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PREVENTION TOOL OF THE WEEK #1

Strength Campaign

Men Can Stop Rape's Strength Campaign is a highly flexible, adaptable and multi-faceted public education and social marketing campaign, designed to help young men to build healthy masculinity and positively influence peers to make healthy choices that foster safe, equitable relationships.


CHECK IT OUT

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PREVENTION TOOL OF THE WEEK #3

Awareness + Action = Social Change

The “Awareness + Action = Social Change” message from the Domestic Violence Awareness Project introduces a prevention component to domestic violence awareness efforts, emphasizing that to accomplish real social transformation, we must incorporate concrete action steps that individuals, families, communities, and institutions can take to promote safe, healthy, and thriving environments for all.

CHECK IT OUT

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TA QUESTION OF THE MONTH

How can movement building support our efforts for social change and collective thriving?

Over the last few years, the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence has embodied the idea that “what you pay attention to grows” as they have worked to grow their movement building efforts. In VAWnet's October TA Question of the Month, the Idaho Coalition shares lessons learned from their journey toward social connectedness and collective liberation.


CHECK IT OUT

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PREVENTION TOOL OF THE WEEK #2

Toward Community Health and Justice

This report from PreventConnect highlights key themes that emerged over the course of eight web conferences, including the importance of working together with communities to shift social norms, using a health equity approach to address the root factors of violence, and expanding efforts to improve the physical/built environment and economic opportunities.


CHECK IT OUT

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PREVENTION TOOL OF THE WEEK #4

Preventing Intimate Partner Violence Across the Lifespan

This technical package from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers a compilation of evidence-based strategies across each level of the social ecology for preventing intimate partner violence at every age.

CHECK IT OUT
 
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The quarterly PreventIPV eNewsletter highlights new additions to the PreventIPV website and features innovative prevention programs, events, publications, campaigns, funding opportunities, and other happenings of note in the prevention field. 

 
Copyright © 2019 IPV Prevention Council, All rights reserved.

This publication was made possible by Grant Number #90EV0428 to the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence from the Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.


To learn more about the IPV Prevention Council and the PreventIPV project, click here.






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National Resource Center on Domestic Violence · 6041 Linglestown Rd · Harrisburg, PENNSYLVANIA 17112 · USA