International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)
This month read about water provision in Lebanon, a new biocultural heritage landscape in the Himalayas, new roles at IIED and more...
December 2017
Photo of Lebanese children

Five fundamentals to keep Lebanon's water flowing

The war that has devastated Syria for the last six years has led to a humanitarian crisis in the region and has had huge ramifications for Lebanon's ability to provide basic services such as electricity, sanitation, waste collection, and water.

In a new longread, IIED researcher Anna Walnycki considers how efforts to meet the water needs of refugee host communities in Lebanon have evolved. She shows how five fundamentals can help Lebanon's water sector deliver reliable water services and mitigate unknown future shocks.

News and blogs

New Community Forest Instructions give communities rights to commercially sell timber and non-timber forest products, such as such as rattan and honey (Photo: Duncan Macqueen/IIED)

Forest rights create new livelihoods in Myanmar

In Myanmar, rights to forest land are being transferred to local communities. Duncan Macqueen explains how this important move, supported by peer-to-peer learning, is helping to establish new long-term livelihoods.
Achala C Abeysinghe (second left) recently spoke on a panel discussion at COP23 on Women Leading the World's Climate Agenda (Photo: Anne Schulthess/IIED)

COP23 outcomes call for faster action and higher ambition to keep Paris on track

Achala Abeysinghe reports back from last month's UNFCCC COP23 and asks whether the outcomes of this year's UN climate summit will be enough to keep the Paris Agreement on course.
Photo of people from Kalimpong, India, in the Himalayas

Spotlight on... Biocultural heritage landscape to be established in Eastern Himalayas

Around 50 participants gathered for a workshop in November titled 'Methods, tools and processes for establishing biocultural heritage landscapes.' Participants at the event which was held near Kalimpong, India, in the Eastern Himalayas, committed to establish a biocultural heritage landscape to protect the biodiversity and cultural heritage of the area and its indigenous peoples. 

As well as conserving biodiversity, biocultural heritage landscapes aim to support local economic growth which incorporates indigenous land tenure systems, methods of food production, and spiritual and cultural identities. They aim to protect areas with rich biodiversity for the future, enhancing food security and securing crop diversity for climate change adaptation. 

New publications this month

Exploring the role of empowerment in urban humanitarian responses in Freetown
Exploring the role of empowerment in urban humanitarian responses in Freetown looks at humanitarian responses in the Portee-Rokupa neighbourhood of Freetown. It explores how approaches have been able to build the capacities of informal dwellers’ groups, foster collaboration among different stakeholders, enable critical learning, and open up opportunities for the recognition of the diverse needs and aspirations of vulnerable groups within the wider policy and planning environment.
Least Developed Countries' experiences with the UNFCCC technology mechanism
The Least Developed Counties (LDCs) have worked with the two branches of the UNFCCC’s Technology Mechanism for several years. Least Developed Countries' experiences with the UNFCCC technology mechanism aims to better understand the barriers and challenges LDCs face in implementing technology development and transfer and explores what changes to existing technology and financial institutions could lessen these barriers and challenges.
Lessons learnt from 20 years of revenue sharing at Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda
For the past 20 years a revenue-sharing scheme has been in place for communities surrounding Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda. Lessons learnt from 20 years of revenue sharing at Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda looks at how revenue sharing might become more effective and more equitable.
Manuel d’opérations sous forme de « lignes directrices » pour l’expropriation pour cause d’utilité publique et la compensation des terres et des ressources naturelles en République de Guinée
This manual titled Manuel d’opérations sous forme de « lignes directrices » pour l’expropriation pour cause d’utilité publique et la compensation des terres et des ressources naturelles en République de Guinée drafted for the Republic of Guinea as part of Global Water Initiative - West Africa (GWI), clarifies and complements land expropriation procedures for projects such as large dams, mines or roads, and facilitates their implementation through a participatory, transparent and harmonised approach at the national level. 

This document is available in French only.

Briefings

Refugee economies: lessons from Addis Ababa

Protecting children on the move: using endogenous practices in urban Mali

Gouvernance des hautes mers : priorités pour les pays les moins avancés
Welcome to IIED / job vacancies

Job vacancies

Researcher

The Climate Change research group at IIED is looking for a researcher with UNFCCC experience to work on the development and implementation of the group's programme of work related to global climate change processes and implementation of outcomes. 

Closing date: 10am (GMT), 5 January 2018
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